Working Dog Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the breeds my friend said I couldn't have if he wasn't neutered, but I'm sure I could work on him to allow me. They are good in the cold since their coats are thick. They are protective of their territory. I obviously can't allow an akita inu to free roam. I was considering this breed before by my friend had to give me a ton of bad notions this would be a terrible dog. He had bad experiences with a certain akita in the past.

I know in japan these dogs are used in policing, but is it common any of enforcement in the US to use these dogs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
i would stop reading the AKC breed profiles if I were you :twisted:. Personally, i have never seen/heard of Akitas doing any type of sport work/ ppd work or anything beyond OB which they are not terribly good at
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sam Leinweber said:
i would stop reading the AKC breed profiles if I were you :twisted:. Personally, i have never seen/heard of Akitas doing any type of sport work/ ppd work or anything beyond OB which they are not terribly good at
PPD? I don't think so :p I don't need no stinkin' protection, I have my S&W. Just because the dog can protect me doesn't mean I'd need him. Anyway, the whole reason behind me wanting an intact dog is for 1) training, and 2) possibly breeding, and 3) maybe being a overzealous show off even though it is discouraged. Even if I had a protective dog and bred them, they sure hell won't be given to anyone wanting them for home protection. There are way too many dogs which were bought for "home protection" and end up in he pound. :(
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,196 Posts
<<the whole reason behind me wanting an intact dog is for 1) training, and 2) possibly breeding, and 3) maybe being a overzealous show off>>

I'm not trying to be confrontational, but there is no other way to ask this question than straight out with it:

Is that the reason you are so interested in giant breeds, to have something different and perhaps imposing or intimidating, just to get attention? I'm curious.

DFrost
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
David Frost said:
<<the>>

I'm not trying to be confrontational, but there is no other way to ask this question than straight out with it:

Is that the reason you are so interested in giant breeds, to have something different and perhaps imposing or intimidating, just to get attention? I'm curious.

DFrost
No, the question is very valid. I know giant breeds often have health problems. Currently I've a 71lb malamute. She is cute and everything, does what I want. I think my issue is psychological. Giant dogs give me a sense of nostalgia and make me remember how I used to be when I was smaller around large dogs, or what I considered a 60lb GSD as a pet as a giant animal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
[/quote] Anyway, the whole reason behind me wanting an intact dog is for 1) training, and 2) possibly breeding, [/quote]

How can you be interested in breeding a dog when you don't know anything about the breed at minimum?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Anyway, the whole reason behind me wanting an intact dog is for 1) training, and 2) possibly breeding, [/quote]

How can you be interested in breeding a dog when you don't know anything about the breed at minimum?[/quote]

I know information on many breeds, nobody can know everything. Its the whole challenge in learning about a new breed as well.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Bob Scott said:
:-k Big dog, S&W!
David R, by chance do you have a red sports car?
heh, if I owned a red sports car here, I'd be dead from a car crash. I own a generic Subaru Outback :) I'm wanting to get a larger and longer truck for workin stuff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
a red sports car -- nice.


Why would you care about the workability of a dog (if it functions as a working psd) if you don't want it for sport/ ppd or whatever else is generally considered work? If you want an intact dog but are unsure of yourself as a handler, why would you get a breed whose only pronounced feature outside of its fluffy coat is its dominant nature?

Honestly, the only value \an Akita would have in the working world is its novelty. Whatever breed you end up with (unless you are looking at traditionally used higher drive dogs) will have the same unorthodox value. So just pick a breed based on aesthetic appeal. Personally, Tibetan Mastiffs are nice looking dogs and I guess they live longer than your average large breed....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
528 Posts
The ones Ive been around were dumb as a rock.

And I cant stand that tail.I once got rid of a female Dutchie that had an Akita looking tail.Should a kept her but I couldnt get over that damn tail.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,588 Posts
i know our trainer was a decoy in a police k9 trial in the 70's that an akita competed in. i don't remember what his impression of the dog was. he has a picture in his office of the dog on a sleeve....
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sam Leinweber said:
a red sports car -- nice.


Why would you care about the workability of a dog (if it functions as a working psd) if you don't want it for sport/ ppd or whatever else is generally considered work? If you want an intact dog but are unsure of yourself as a handler, why would you get a breed whose only pronounced feature outside of its fluffy coat is its dominant nature?

Honestly, the only value \an Akita would have in the working world is its novelty. Whatever breed you end up with (unless you are looking at traditionally used higher drive dogs) will have the same unorthodox value. So just pick a breed based on aesthetic appeal. Personally, Tibetan Mastiffs are nice looking dogs and I guess they live longer than your average large breed....
Breeding would be fun if I could get in to it. Helping the bitch 2300 to 0000 at night, fun fun fun :) Watching feeding, and enjoying the little ones play around in the pen and when they grow bigger.. DOGGIES ALL OVER!! :D

There was a old guy in the next city who used to breed akitas. From what i can gather they were protective, but loved kids and people. The guy always brought them to the library(dogs allowed). They were the joy of the very small 800 population city. I'd love to get one of them but the guy disappeared. Al breeds depend on the bloodlines, I'm sure the general akita which people breed hate everyone but its handler, but there are always the cases like the guy and the woman who I received my girl.

I don't like appeal, show is for birds. Show would be good to be a show off, but still for the birds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,548 Posts
David Ross said:
Breeding would be fun if I could get in to it. Helping the bitch 2300 to 0000 at night, fun fun fun :) Watching feeding, and enjoying the little ones play around in the pen and when they grow bigger.. DOGGIES ALL OVER!! :D

There was a old guy in the next city who used to breed akitas. From what i can gather they were protective, but loved kids and people. The guy always brought them to the library(dogs allowed). They were the joy of the very small 800 population city. I'd love to get one of them but the guy disappeared. Al breeds depend on the bloodlines, I'm sure the general akita which people breed hate everyone but its handler, but there are always the cases like the guy and the woman who I received my girl.

I don't like appeal, show is for birds. Show would be good to be a show off, but still for the birds.
I think you are seriously underestimating the sheer amount of work involved with breeding. You need to find a breed mentor, spend an awful long time digging through and researching bloodlines and pedigrees, have a decent understanding of basic genetic and genetic traits and how they go together in Punnett squares and that sort of thing, talk to a lot of people in the breed who actually know what they are talking about. Then when you finally pick out your foundation, depending on the breed, they'll likely need hips, elbows, eyes, possibly thyroid and heart, and a few other breed specific disorders to be tested for. If you are not going to be interested in competing in a sport like any of the dog protection sports or agility or whatever else, they also should be temperament tested and/or at LEAST get their AKC Canine Good Citizen. An obedience title or three is nice as well. I'm not that into dog shows, but if you might be going down that road (and many others will have good looking dogs), the dog should be titled before breeding. And this isn't even before the puppies are even conceived. Basically, you need to prove that you have worthy specimens who are structurally sound mentally and physically and can do some sort of activity besides just be a pet. You say you don't want a pet, but eh, I think that's what you do in fact want. A nice dog that can run with you, be reasonably obedient, and who looks physically imposing by their size.

Millions of dogs get put to sleep every year in animal shelters, often because there is just no room. I recommend everyone thinking about becoming a breeder to spend 6-12 months volunteering at a shelter or with a breed rescue. You could help with foster, transport, training, or any number of things. But they show that you are sincerely interested in the breed and not just in lining your pockets. And as for the money, I don't know about the dog protection sport folk, but most responsible breeders make very little money, if any. Someone feel free to speak up for me, but I'd wager most breeders in the protection sports have put so much into equipment and training, they don't make too awful much either. Gas money alone driving to and from obedience practice or to trials or seminars or whatever to title your dog is very high. I don't know, but I think you'd just be happier dropping 50K on a Hummer or a really nice Harley. Lot less effort that way and I think it'd stoke your ego better than a dog.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,751 Posts
David Ross said:
Breeding would be fun if I could get in to it. Helping the bitch 2300 to 0000 at night, fun fun fun :) Watching feeding, and enjoying the little ones play around in the pen and when they grow bigger.. DOGGIES ALL OVER!! :D
That´s the worst reason for breeding....´cause YOU like little puppies around :twisted: ...the "breeders" who breed dog on this base, find their puppies usually very soon in the rehoming-centers :cry:

*edit: I see Maren beat me in writing a reply, and she explained much better*
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,210 Posts
Then there is the "miracle of birth" reason.

I want the shelters to give a "miracle of death" seminar. :( Everyone who has ever done shelter work knows all about it and all about the contribution of casual breeders to the 3 million additional dogs who enter shelters every year in this country. 25% of those are pure bred, BTW.

Thank you, Selena, for an authoritative reply from a responsible breeder.

Thank you, Maren.

I think it's possible that the O.P. hadn't stopped to think about what responsible breeding entails, so I'm glad he brought it up.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Maren Bell Jones said:
David Ross said:
Breeding would be fun if I could get in to it. Helping the bitch 2300 to 0000 at night, fun fun fun :) Watching feeding, and enjoying the little ones play around in the pen and when they grow bigger.. DOGGIES ALL OVER!! :D

There was a old guy in the next city who used to breed akitas. From what i can gather they were protective, but loved kids and people. The guy always brought them to the library(dogs allowed). They were the joy of the very small 800 population city. I'd love to get one of them but the guy disappeared. Al breeds depend on the bloodlines, I'm sure the general akita which people breed hate everyone but its handler, but there are always the cases like the guy and the woman who I received my girl.

I don't like appeal, show is for birds. Show would be good to be a show off, but still for the birds.
I think you are seriously underestimating the sheer amount of work involved with breeding. You need to find a breed mentor, spend an awful long time digging through and researching bloodlines and pedigrees, have a decent understanding of basic genetic and genetic traits and how they go together in Punnett squares and that sort of thing, talk to a lot of people in the breed who actually know what they are talking about. Then when you finally pick out your foundation, depending on the breed, they'll likely need hips, elbows, eyes, possibly thyroid and heart, and a few other breed specific disorders to be tested for. If you are not going to be interested in competing in a sport like any of the dog protection sports or agility or whatever else, they also should be temperament tested and/or at LEAST get their AKC Canine Good Citizen. An obedience title or three is nice as well. I'm not that into dog shows, but if you might be going down that road (and many others will have good looking dogs), the dog should be titled before breeding. And this isn't even before the puppies are even conceived. Basically, you need to prove that you have worthy specimens who are structurally sound mentally and physically and can do some sort of activity besides just be a pet. You say you don't want a pet, but eh, I think that's what you do in fact want. A nice dog that can run with you, be reasonably obedient, and who looks physically imposing by their size.

Millions of dogs get put to sleep every year in animal shelters, often because there is just no room. I recommend everyone thinking about becoming a breeder to spend 6-12 months volunteering at a shelter or with a breed rescue. You could help with foster, transport, training, or any number of things. But they show that you are sincerely interested in the breed and not just in lining your pockets. And as for the money, I don't know about the dog protection sport folk, but most responsible breeders make very little money, if any. Someone feel free to speak up for me, but I'd wager most breeders in the protection sports have put so much into equipment and training, they don't make too awful much either. Gas money alone driving to and from obedience practice or to trials or seminars or whatever to title your dog is very high. I don't know, but I think you'd just be happier dropping 50K on a Hummer or a really nice Harley. Lot less effort that way and I think it'd stoke your ego better than a dog.
Well from the research, there are little to no Saint Bernards at the rescues I called. Also, I've a person who can be a mentor. they'd definitely get their CGC, and most likely will go in shows maybe a trial here and there. I 'm a big hypocrite when I say show is for birds, because I also want to be in them, heh. money? the breeder I talk with often always says she balances out almost right, sometimes looking a few bucks when a little is done exactly right. It isn't for money. The reason is to give me a long term project to work on which will keep me off the friggen computer ;) I used to have about 4 dogs, they all died and I never received another then ended up moving away. I had all types of animals :/ A miniature farm on a residence.

a hummer? how worthless and selfish, I'd rather spread a specific breed happiness. I can be a show off at the local dog show ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,210 Posts
David Ross said:
... Well from the research, there are little to no Saint Bernards at the rescues I called. ....
That's research?

The shelters you called failed to mention the St. Bernard rescues?

Second Chance St. Bernard Rescue, Beethoven's Haven, and many others regularly take the dogs who are surrendered to shelters, foster them, and try to find homes for them. This is true of most breeds, although the more populous breeds are represented by rescues that can't possibly keep up.

Calling a shelter and asking how many of a breed they have is meaningless without researching the rescues too.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Connie Sutherland said:
David Ross said:
... Well from the research, there are little to no Saint Bernards at the rescues I called. ....
That's research?

The shelters you called failed to mention the St. Bernard rescues?

Second Chance St. Bernard Rescue, Beethoven's Haven, and many others regularly take the dogs who are surrendered to shelters, foster them, and try to find homes for them. This is true of most breeds, although the more populous breeds are represented by rescues that can't possibly keep up.

Calling a shelter and asking how many of a breed they have is meaningless without researching the rescues too.
specifically saint bernard rescues yes. They seem to snatch away the dogs from the pound when they get in here, the ones in Alaska anyway. After I decided I possibly want to become a breeder after I have a stud, I done research on dog demand vs in pound. This is kind of odd but there are very few in pound here versus the numbers years ago. The shelter lady said she can't keep dogs in the pound, everybody wants them. Some odd "dog craze" is here, hope it stays the same way forever.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Connie Sutherland said:
Then there is the "miracle of birth" reason.

I want the shelters to give a "miracle of death" seminar. :( Everyone who has ever done shelter work knows all about it and all about the contribution of casual breeders to the 3 million additional dogs who enter shelters every year in this country. 25% of those are pure bred, BTW.

Thank you, Selena, for an authoritative reply from a responsible breeder.

Thank you, Maren.

I think it's possible that the O.P. hadn't stopped to think about what responsible breeding entails, so I'm glad he brought it up.
I could personally be the executioner, death dare not try scaring me. I used to break animal's necks which I received I didn't think will make it. An overdose of sedative is easier.

the 25% I'm guessing doesn't include the designer crap breeds like a cockapoo, and rubbish? ;)

I do and also realize how many dogs are in the pounds, you should ask if I've done any research, I'd say yes. Before I did want to start a specific rescue, but there just aren't enough people in the area which have a much of a specific breed they want to get rid of, find a new home, or leave behind. I do realize what responsible breeding entails, and have a knowledgeable person filling in the blanks and about a certain breed.
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top