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1. There's a good video on this board of a homemade basement course, and the handler is talking the dog through it.

2. Two trainers I admire enormously say they rarely vocalize with their dogs beyond simple commands and markers and that their touch is much more frequent than their use of voice. (One, though, actually uses very low murmurs [often sub-verbal] a lot, but I don't know if he knows it.)

3. I probably talk to my own dogs much more than they actually listen, but I have a certain command voice and another specific marker voice, and I believe they listen quite well to those.

4. With other people's dogs, I tend to command, mark, and little else in the way of actual speaking. I think.

Does anyone have any opinions about the benefits and/or drawbacks of verbalization beyond actual commands (and markers, if you use voice markers)?
 

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I talk to my dogs all the time. My wife says I talk dog because of the way they respond to me. I think it's more about body language and inflection of voice.
I do use voice markers even in everyday activities but I don't use my "yes"! That's reserved for the training field.
 

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I talk to my dogs. They seem to understand words inside phrases apart from commands. I talk to them in whole sentences... "Hey, you, get out there and pee." While dog is sniffing around: "Hurry up and pee!" Dog looks up, and goes and pees. Comes back up, I ask, "You sure you don't wanna poop while you're at it?" Dog whines, goes back to lawn, poops. It creeps people out. :lol: I think it's a combination of the words and the context they're used in, and maybe a fair bit amount of tone of voice. They seem to listen to me a lot though since I don't talk 'needlessly' to them--I either want them to do something, I'm asking them if they want something, anything to do with them. They read me pretty well--their names alone can mean a number of different things, from "Just pop your head up to tell me where you are" to "Look here" to "Come here" to "NO!". I never consciously taught them to recognize those different meanings but they seem to understand each time.

In the field I only use singular commands to make things clear for them.
 
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