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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here are a few photos taken of my dog Hero during today's training at our team's rubble pile in Mass.

Note that I am nowhere in sight. I am off the pile, way at the back. Our FEMA dogs are required to work independently of the handler, and Hero does this very well. The person you see in the photos is the "safety," whose purpose is to make sure the "victim" and dog are both safe during the training.

Hero searching the rubble for the hidden "victim":




Hero finds and "alerts" (sustained bark alert until I arrive) on the hidden "victim" who is located a few feet below the surface of the rubble (completely hidden from view):


Fun fun!
 

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Very cool!
Thunder was trained in wilderness/cadaver/boat work and evidence recovery but the few times I had the chance to train with a FEMA team on a rubble pile we throughly enjoyed it.
 

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I went over to Columbia Mo a few times and trained there. I was with Missouri Region C at the time.
I've been out of SAR for over a year now.
 

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I was very impressed with their training. I almost joined them when I left Region C but was very involved with Schutzhund by then and training times didn't mesh.
 

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i have a question about the rubble pile. given the material it looks like it's made of, aren't there a limited # of victim hiding places that the dogs figure out pretty quickly? do you rearrange it with a backhoe or something to change the configuration?

are those big lights i see for night training?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Great question, Ann. And yes, they'll figure out the hiding places over time if you don't change it around. We have re-arranged things in the past (with heavy equipment) to create new hiding places. We also have a few other sites in Mass and Connecticut where we train. Most importantly, we travel to other training sites across the country and also get permission to train on demolition sites nearby. The more we can expose our dogs to, the better. Every "disaster" creates unique situations and its imperative that our dogs work regardless of conditions.

Yes - those are lights for night training!
 

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konnie,

i can only think of 2 things to say: 1) thank god you train out east where there's some "different" challenges for the dogs in, shall we say "realistic" distances, and 2) thank god for you and your team and all others like it.

perhaps i should re-arrange #1 and 2--but you get my drift....and that goes for ALL SAR dogs/ppl... :)
 
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