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I know this has been addressed in other threads under advanced training,
http://www.workingdogforum.com/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?p=1408#1408
http://www.workingdogforum.com/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=154&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0
but I'm hoping that we could also get it into this Obedience section----mainly because it's probably the most important command, and because this Obedience section is shaping up so well! :D

As Bob Scott points out, at the beginning it's good to have no other real option: there's the handler with a toy/treat/energy, and there's ........ nothing else of interest around. (Also, we are in an enclosed area, of course.) And with a dog who is new to us, we might want to create the bond before starting this training.

And could we get suggestions for the distraction phase, once the \"come\" is 100% solid, with no distraction? My local high school was way too much when I tried that. I think my own yard might be better, but what are good distractions? Has anyone ever started with a non-moving one, like a piece of nice treat not near you, say? Or a toy the dog loves placed in the opposite direction from where you are? (Just trolling for new ideas on a basic command......)
 

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if the command is good without distraction I will do it with distraction in away I am still in control (long leash preferable, otherwise e-collar).
Hier (come) is always Hier, if they know what is meant by the command :wink:

example: I have been telling you about Anne (9 mo), who was a bit trying out, haven´t I? She had an e-collar on for a few weeks, evertime she was running freely.
Yesterday, we did bitework on the sleeve and my long leash broke :twisted: , nothing better than run around with a sleeve you just won, isn´t it? Just had to call here once and she came straight back! Playing with me and the sleeve (was her reward for coming back to me).

distraction enough, sleeve, other people in the trainingfields next to us, the waterbin etc.
 

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Selena van Leeuwen said:
if the command is good without distraction I will do it with distraction in away I am still in control (long leash preferable, otherwise e-collar)......Hier (come) is always Hier, if they know what is meant by the command :wink: ...example: I have been telling you about Anne (9 mo), who was a bit trying out, haven´t I? She had an e-collar on for a few weeks, evertime she was running freely.
Yesterday, we did bitework on the sleeve and my long leash broke :twisted: , nothing better than run around with a sleeve you just won, isn´t it? Just had to call here once and she came straight back! Playing with me and the sleeve (was her reward for coming back to me)....
distraction enough, sleeve, other people in the trainingfields next to us, the waterbin etc.
I almost always have to train without an e-collar (other people's dogs, and one of my own, too, so far).

So in my case, I would want the come to be solid under distraction (as yours obviously is). What would you use for beginning distraction without an e-collar?
 

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It's all a matter of learning how much distraction can be added without creating problems.
 

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Connie Sutherland said:
So in my case, I would want the come to be solid under distraction (as yours obviously is). What would you use for beginning distraction without an e-collar?
long leash and built up distraction, so for example, go to a (dog)park when you know there isn´t much distraction, built this up by getting there earlier/later when there is much distraction. Long leash so you´re always in control :wink:
 

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Selena van Leeuwen said:
Connie Sutherland said:
So in my case, I would want the come to be solid under distraction (as yours obviously is). What would you use for beginning distraction without an e-collar?
long leash and built up distraction, so for example, go to a (dog)park when you know there isn´t much distraction, built this up by getting there earlier/later when there is much distraction. Long leash so you´re always in control :wink:
same here Selena.....long leash IMO is one of the best ways
 

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When I read everything right, is that you call your dog to come he will com in right before you,

What I do sometimes, is uses two balls, throw one, when he has the ball I call him and said here, I show him the other one, witch is with you, mostly I let him sit and let hem give the ball, and throw the other away, its also a good exercise to speed up your dog,

Hopefully you understand the way I try to explain it
 

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What we do to get a fast come. We let someone else hold the dog on a leash and the owner will call the dog name as he runs away. ( Building drive) WThe owner will turn around after some distance and call the dog to come. It will come very fast. When the dog gets to him the dog has to do a front sit. As soon as that buut hits the ground he gets his reward, food or toy. This is how we start puppies.
 

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This is from the Handbook of Dog Behavior And Training\" Vol I Adaptation and Learning; Steven R. Lindsay
\"Long walks consisting of occasional suprise maneuvers, exciting change of pace, unexpected chase and counter chase episodes, hide-and-seek games, puncuated with occasional opportunites for ball play or stick fetching-all facilitate the learning of appropriate \"staying close\" skills in puppies. Such interaction strongly stimulates leader-follower bonding and other socila componemts conductive to obedience training. If puppies are not exposed to such expieriences during the socialization period, as adult dogs they are typically more difficult to train come when called orto stay nearby on walks.\"
Folks! I'm an absolute freak when it comes to getting our dogs off on the right start. It's amazing what can be done with a pup between 8-16 wks old.
This is basically what I've done with pups my whole life. I had no idea what I was doing then. I thought I was just having fun with my dogs. Now some guy with a degree is writing books about it. :roll: go figure! :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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Bob Scott said:
This is from the Handbook of Dog Behavior And Training\" Vol I Adaptation and Learning; Steven R. Lindsay
\"Long walks consisting of occasional suprise maneuvers, exciting change of pace, unexpected chase and counter chase episodes, hide-and-seek games, puncuated with occasional opportunites for ball play or stick fetching-all facilitate the learning of appropriate \"staying close\" skills in puppies. Such interaction strongly stimulates leader-follower bonding and other socila componemts conductive to obedience training. If puppies are not exposed to such expieriences during the socialization period, as adult dogs they are typically more difficult to train come when called orto stay nearby on walks.\"
Folks! I'm an absolute freak when it comes to getting our dogs off on the right start. It's amazing what can be done with a pup between 8-16 wks old.
This is basically what I've done with pups my whole life. I had no idea what I was doing then. I thought I was just having fun with my dogs. Now some guy with a degree is writing books about it. :roll: go figure! :lol: :lol: :lol:
This and Jerry's post just above it are excellent additions to this thread.

This section is shaping up GREAT, IMHO, and thanks!
 
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