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A question:

Is there a source for training definitions? Not just commands [in the various languages] but technique references such as 'chaining.'

I've been browsing the many interesting and insightful posts and there are references to training techniques which are not concise enough for my ADHD vision of the world.

Probably the answer is to read the various training approaches and learn the jargon but I was just wondering if there is/was a kind of Webster's for the various words and applications.

I apologize in advance for posting such a novice-like question.
 

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Michael Arnold said:
A question:

Is there a source for training definitions? Not just commands [in the various languages] but technique references such as 'chaining.'

I've been browsing the many interesting and insightful posts and there are references to training techniques which are not concise enough for my ADHD vision of the world.

Probably the answer is to read the various training approaches and learn the jargon but I was just wondering if there is/was a kind of Webster's for the various words and applications.

I apologize in advance for posting such a novice-like question.

It's a good question, just thinking that there aren't a lot of techniques that are generally consistent among trainers (at least in how they use it, whether their goals are the same or not). Probably easiest to throw out a term you're wondering about and let the forum digest it (argue about it). Good example of this with "civil behavior" we had this week.

Maybe others have a site that has a general glossary of techniques, feel free to link it as I'm sure everybody will disagree with some of it. :lol:

So what's "chaining?"
 

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chaining= pasting different behaviours to 1 excercise.

for example: retrieving a dumbell (ground retrieving IPO/sch)

The dog must sit quietly beside you (fuss position)when you throw the dumbell, retrieve the dumbell on your command (go to the dumbell reasonly fast, pick it up neatly and return to you), sit before you with the dumbell, without chewing it, out dumbell on your command. And then go to his startposition (fuss) on your command.

I learn a dog fuss position.
I learn dog to hold dumbell quietly in his mouth sitting before me (backworths chaining, this is end position).
I learn dog to get dumbell fast and returning fast, he knows already the endposition.
these are all different behaviors,then I paste it all together..
 

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Ah. I just called that "breaking down an exercise into little parts." :wink:
 

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Ok so whats the difference between a hard dog and a civil dog? From a thread earlier I figured out what a labrador temperment on a mal would be like.

Definition wise I mean. I am sure I have a good idea but would someone indulge me?
 

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Civil: Willing to bite with no equipment.

Hard: Generally, a dog that has a high threshhold for an external influence. Most refer to this in regards to decoy pressure (high pain tolerance, not easily shaken by intenstiy) or "handler hard", meaning a dog that is not greatly effected by corrections.
 

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Civil: Willing to bite with no equipment.

Hard: Generally, a dog that has a high threshhold for an external influence. Most refer to this in regards to decoy pressure (high pain tolerance, not easily shaken by intenstiy) or "handler hard", meaning a dog that is not greatly effected by corrections.
so the word civil is tongue in cheek or is it short for Civilian or something like that = meanig this dog will bite you w/ or w/ out a sleeve or bite suit.
 

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Jason it confused me too until I started hanging out with sport folks. For me, civil always meant the dog was ok around people (social). I still use civil like that; 1. cause I'm old, and it's hard to change 2. drives the sport folks crazy.

DFrost
 

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The law enforcement community has put a lot of effort into standardizing terms and much more. The work can be found at this website; http://www.swgdog.org/

Their intentions are very honorable. Of course there is always the petty arguments and politics that seem to encroach into anything like this. None the less, the members are a selective and with few exceptions noteworthy people in the "industry".

DFrost
 

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so the word civil is tongue in cheek or is it short for Civilian or something like that = meanig this dog will bite you w/ or w/ out a sleeve or bite suit.
That's a good question and to be completely honest, I agree that it makes no sense. It's not really a tongue-in-cheek thing and to my knowedge, it has nothing to do with "civilian" (although that could have been what it originated as, I've never heard that to be the case). "Social" is what most (everyone but David) call a dog that is at minimum trustworthy around strangers. Different people have their own standards of what they consider social/ civil...one may consider "social" as barely tolerant of strangers, whereas someone else may not consider a dog to be "social" unless it really seeks out and enjoys attention from strangers.
 

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A hard dog = A dog that quicly forgets and do not lern from painfull ore fritening avents, Also the same with corections.

The dog might stop for a sec but will do the same stupid thing again, again and again. He will not make a "mental picture" of a corection and it will pass him by.

Week/soft dog = A dog that easely remebers painfull ore fritening avents, Also freeses upp from corections.

This dog will fal of a lader ones and then he will never trye to get up on one again. you will corect him when you train and he will never trye that move again ore totely crumbel.

That is a hard Vs soft dog to me. Hard and Civil aint the same thing. you can have a hard dog that is realy sosial and likes peopel, They just have a realy tuff time trying to controll him if he wants to do stuff his own way :)
 

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The law enforcement community has put a lot of effort into standardizing terms and much more. The work can be found at this website; http://www.swgdog.org/

Their intentions are very honorable. Of course there is always the petty arguments and politics that seem to encroach into anything like this. None the less, the members are a selective and with few exceptions noteworthy people in the "industry".

DFrost

I agree with you David....the "Terminology" sections under their approved and pending guidelines are very informative. Their practical application of some terms is very insightful.

The aforementioned sections are in PDF format and can be printed out.
 

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'civil' always made sense to me, since the word means 'relating to people' and a civil dog is going to focus on the man and not any (sport) equipment, whereas a non civil dog wouldnt have any interest in a man without the gear
 

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How about this for a guess?

"In the 1960's, K-9 teams were used extensively for crowd control due to the high incidents of civil unrest during this period."

Rogue Cops and Wild Dogs: An Analysis of Media Representation of Police Canines Units
Chloe A. Tischler, Radford University


ABSTRACT

The use of police dogs gained notoriety during civil unrest during the 1960's. Since then the news media have played a continuing and vital role in the information the public receives about the use or misuse of police canine units. Does the news media more frequently report on the successful use of police canine units in "fighting" crime or is there a tendency, as some police experts maintain, to paint these specialized units as a band of lawless officers who are roaming the streets, allowing innocent or unsuspecting parties to be furiously attacked by their vicious four legged partners. This paper reports on the findings of a content analysis of regional news coverage of the amount and type of "positive" or "negative" reports involving the use of police dogs or canine units.
 

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"A hard dog = A dog that quicly forgets and do not lern from painfull ore fritening avents, Also the same with corections.

The dog might stop for a sec but will do the same stupid thing again, again and again. He will not make a "mental picture" of a corection and it will pass him by.

Week/soft dog = A dog that easely remebers painfull ore fritening avents, Also freeses upp from corections.

This dog will fal of a lader ones and then he will never trye to get up on one again. you will corect him when you train and he will never trye that move again ore totely crumbel.

That is a hard Vs soft dog to me. Hard and Civil aint the same thing. you can have a hard dog that is realy sosial and likes peopel, They just have a realy tuff time trying to controll him if he wants to do stuff his own way
"


Very good description Andreas, totally agree

Happy training

Max
 
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