Working Dog Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,068 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/CCAH/Update06-2/6-2_Taurine.html

Here's an interesting article on Dietary Taurine Deficiency and Dilated Cardiomyopathy in Dogs. This article references cases and findings in several pilot studies which suggest that diet does affect taurine metabolism in dogs and may play a role in the development of DCM.

Apparently some breeds of dogs - notably the Newfoundland and the Doberman - have trouble making their own Taurine. Another website I found lists the following breeds as being susceptible to Dilated Cardiomyopathy: "Doberman Pinschers, Boxers, Great Danes, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards, Cocker Spaniels, Golden Retrievers and German Shepherd Dogs. More than 90% of cases of canine DCM are confined to these eight breeds. The disease is likely genetic in origin, although this has not yet been proved and the mode of inheritance has yet to be documented. Middle-aged dogs are most often affected. "

Studies have indicated that supplementation with taurine may be beneficial in American Cocker Spaniels and Golden Retrievers with dilated cardiomyopathy.

(from http://www.ygrr.org/doginfo/health-heartcondition.html)

Something to think about, whether you feed raw or kibble, but esp. if you feed kibble. Meat (esp. the heart muscle), poultry, eggs, dairy products, and fish are good sources of taurine. It is destroyed by heat, so it must be added to cooked kibble in order to be usable by the dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
Very Interesting. Thanks for posting that. I do feed kibble, Solid Gold. They have just started adding extra taurine to their food. I am now......glad to know that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
This is the article about them adding taurine to the kibble.

From the Solid Gold Website www.SolidGoldHealth.com

DRY FOOD FORMULA CHANGES

We will soon implement changes in our dry foods based upon new exciting research, supply issues, and regulatory changes.

All our dry foods will now contain tomato pomace, taurine, and salmon oil.

Tomato pomace is an excellent source of the super-antioxidant Lycopene. Research shows that people with diets rich in tomato products, which contain lycopene, appear to have a lower risk of certain types of cancer. Tomato pomace is also a superb source of soluble fiber.

Taurine is an amino acid essential for heart health. Historically, taurine supplementation in diet was not thought necessary for dogs, however, research is now showing certain breeds of dogs can have problems with heart disease caused by taurine deficiency. The FDA has now approved Taurine as a feed additive for dogs foods, so we are happy to include it in all our dry dog food formulas.

Salmon oil is an excellent source of DHA (Docosahexaenoic Acid), an Omega 3 fatty acid important for brain and central nervous system development in growing puppies. DHA is also thought to be important for retinal health, so we have added it to all our adult foods as well. The addition of salmon oil may cause the food to smell a bit fishier, which should be a bonus for most dogs and cats!

We have made some other formula changes due to supply issues. For instance, we have substituted “ocean fish meal” for “menhaden fish meal”. The hurricanes in the gulf last summer have practically devastated the menhaden herring supply, which caused the cost of this fish to skyrocket. Ocean fish meal can contain fish such as herring, mackerel, sardines, anchovies, etc. It is much more available at this time than is menhaden herring. It has become difficult to keep a fresh supply of the secondary ingredients we use, such as the herbs, fruits, and vegetables due to only using each ingredient for one or two foods. In order to maintain a constant, fresh supply of ingredients, we have also streamlined the formulas a bit.

None of these changes are major. The core ingredients and formula of all the dry foods remain the same. Most dogs and cats should have absolutely no reaction when switching from the old formula to the new. There may be sensitive dogs and cats though who may have some slight digestive upset. This should diminish as they adjust to the new food.

The new bags will trickle into the system over the next few months. As such, there may be “old” formula and “new” formula on the market at the same time.

New Formulas:

JUST A WEE BIT
Bison, Salmon Meal, Brown Rice, Millet, Cracked Pearled Barley, Rice Bran, Canola Oil, Tomato Pomace, Flaxseed, Natural Flavor, Salmon Oil, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Dried Chicory Root, Parsley Flakes, Pumpkin Meal, Almond Oil, Sesame Oil, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Thyme, Blueberries, Cranberries, Carrots, Broccoli, Vitamins and Minerals

WOLFCUB
Bison, Salmon Meal, Cracked Pearled Barley, Millet, Brown Rice, Rice Bran, Tomato Pomace, Canola Oil, Flaxseed, Natural Flavor, Salmon Oil, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Dried Chicory Root, Parsley Flakes, Pumpkin Meal, Almond Oil, Sesame Oil, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Thyme, Blueberries, Cranberries, Carrots, Broccoli, Vitamins and Minerals

WOLFKING
Bison, Salmon Meal, Brown Rice, Oatmeal, Millet, Cracked Pearled Barley, Rice Bran, Canola Oil, Tomato Pomace, Canola Oil, Flaxseed, Natural Flavor, Salmon Oil, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Dried Chicory Root, Parsley Flakes, Pumpkin Meal, Almond Oil, Sesame Oil, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Thyme, Blueberries, Cranberries, Carrots, Broccoli, Vitamins and Minerals

HOLISTIQUE BLENDZ
Oatmeal, Cracked Pearled Barley, Millet, Ocean Fish Meal, Potatoes, Canola Oil, Tomato Pomace, Flaxseed, Natural Flavor, Salmon Oil, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Dried Chicory Root, Amaranth, Parsley Flakes, Spearmint, Almond Oil, Sesame Oil, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Kelp, Thyme, Blueberries, Cranberries, Apples, Lentils, Quinoa, Vitamins and Minerals

MMILLENNIA
Beef, Beef Meal, Cracked Pearled Barley, Brown Rice, Millet, Rice Bran, Canola Oil, Ocean Fish Meal, Tomato Pomace, Flaxseed, Natural Flavor, Salmon Oil, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Dried Chicory Root, Parsley Flakes, Pumpkin Meal, Almond Oil, Sesame Oil, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Thyme, Blueberries, Cranberries, Carrots, Broccoli, Vitamins and Minerals

HUNDCHEN FLOCKEN
Lamb, Lamb Meal, Ocean Fish Meal, Brown Rice, Millet, Cracked Pearled Barley, Canola Oil, Tomato Pomace, Rice Bran, Flaxseed, Natural Flavor, Salmon Oil, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Dried Chicory Root, Amaranth, Parsley Flakes, Spearmint, Almond Oil, Sesame Oil, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Kelp, Thyme, Blueberries, Cranberries, Apples, Lentils, Quinoa, Vitamins and Minerals

HUND-N-FLOCKEN
Lamb, Lamb Meal, Brown Rice, Cracked Pearled Barley, Millet, Rice Bran, Oatmeal, Ocean Fish Meal, Canola Oil, Tomato Pomace, Flaxseed, Natural Flavor, Salmon Oil, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Dried Chicory Root, Amaranth, Parsley Flakes, Spearmint, Almond Oil, Sesame Oil, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Kelp, Thyme, Blueberries, Cranberries, Apples, Lentils, Quinoa, Vitamins and Minerals

KATZ-N-FLOCKEN
Lamb, Chicken Meal, Millet, Brown Rice, Ocean Fish Meal, Cracked Pearled Barley, Canola Oil, Natural Flavor, Salmon Oil, Flaxseed, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Dried Chicory Root, Salmon Oil, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Dried Chicory Root, Amaranth, Parsley Flakes, Spearmint, Almond Oil, Sesame Oil, Yucca Schidigera Extract, Kelp, Thyme, Blueberries, Cranberries, Apples, Lentils, Quinoa, Vitamins and Minerals
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,210 Posts
About taurine: This is an amino acid that's manufactured from other amino acids in the liver. I think a deficiency of taurine in an otherwise healthy animal would usually come about because of a diet low in animal products or a possibly a diet of all-cooked meat.

I noticed recent research about some breeds (like Newfoundland) with an apparently-genetic inability to manufacture taurine, but I thought I read that it was dogs fed commercial foods or home-COOKED foods. I'll have to read again. :oops:

Thanks, Konnie! Nice catch.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,210 Posts
P.S. About the Omega 3 addition: I want to point out that the long-chain Omega 3s (such as DHA) in fish oil are damaged or destroyed by high heat. This is part of the reason for the advice not to fry fish, and most of the reason for refrigerating opened bottles of fish oil.

So I personally take it with a big grain of salt when a commercial food claims to cover the Omega-3 bases.

This is nothing specific against this food, which has a much better ingredients list than many. It's just a reminder that the package and the web site of a commercial food are basically advertisement and promo.


:wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
I add Seameal, Flaxseed Oil, and Life Exxtension to the food, so hopefully that will cover anything that the food doesnt have. I also feed frozen fresh tripe, and Canned (Canine Caviar) Beaver, Duck, Turkey, and Venison Tripe.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,210 Posts
Amanda Layne said:
I add Seameal, Flaxseed Oil, and Life Exxtension to the food, so hopefully that will cover anything that the food doesnt have. I also feed frozen fresh tripe, and Canned (Canine Caviar) Beaver, Duck, Turkey, and Venison Tripe.
Excellent! 8)

If you are trying to supplement DHA (or any long-chain Omega 3 EFA), then dogs need Omega 3s from marine sources. As good as flax oil is, only humans can convert plant sources of Omega 3s into long-chain EFAs (at about a 10% rate). Dogs cannot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
I actually drive 3 hours to a distributer to get my food. When I go I buy in bulk. He is the distributer for Solid Gold, Canine Caviar, AFS (Animal Food Services) and most recently plain frozen green tripe. He also carries the K-9 Power products. (Superfuel, PuppyGold, GoDog)

It's awesome, it just a huge warehouse, I tell him what I need and we go through with a huge flat cart and load it all up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
Connie, you lost me on the flax oil thing. Would you mind explaining? I have heard mixed things about it anyway. It is the flaxseed oil if that makes a difference. It is a solid gold product also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
This is what the catalog says about flaxseed oil, I guess I just trusted what it said, because I like their products so much. My dogs seem to do really well on their products.

Our premium quality, unrefined flax
seed oil is hexane-free. Hexane is a
chemical solvent used by many manufacturers
to extract the oil from the
seed, and can be extremely allergic for
dogs and cats. Solid Gold Flax Seed
Oil is expeller-pressed to maintain levels
of free fatty acids and protective,
anti-oxidant nutrients. The health benefits
of supplementation with flax
seed oil for pets are numerous.
Flax seed oil is rich in Omega 3 and
6 Essential Fatty Acids (EFA’s) which are protective against degenerative
disease and illness, including bone and joint problems, cancer,
and cardiovascular, kidney and auto-immune disease.
Flax seed oil is excellent for improving skin conditions such as
dandruff or allergic irritation. It also improves the silkiness and
sheen of the coat and helps to heal dry, cracked paws.
Flax oil can be used in conjunction with Solid Gold Seameal, for
immune-related problems. The essential fatty acids found in flax
oil are components of nerve cells and cell membranes.
Flax oil is also one of the best-known sources of lignans, which are
compounds that are thought to have powerful anti-cancer, antifungal
and anti-viral properties, according to Dr Michael T.
Murray, ND, a leading researcher and author of the book, The
Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine.
Our Solid Gold Flax Seed Oil contains a natural, patented
rosemary-based anti-oxidant formula to extend the shelf life of this
product without the use of artificial, chemical preservatives. Our
flax oil is good for up to one year without the need for refrigeration,
if stored at room temperature. However, refrigeration of the
product (particularly after opening) will slow the development of
peroxides (which cause rancidity) even further.
Dr Johanna Budwig, a world-renowned scientist and biochemist,
claims that conditions such as cancer and arthritis are nothing
more than a breakdown of the immune system. She has been
nominated seven times for the Nobel Prize, for her research on
the connection between cancer and fat metabolism. Dr Budwig’s
book is entitled, “Flax Oil As A True Aid Against Arthritis, Heart
Infarction, Cancer & Other Diseases” and is available from the
“Books” section of our catalogue.


Any input is greatly appreciated though!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,210 Posts
Amanda Layne said:
Connie, you lost me on the flax oil thing. Would you mind explaining? I have heard mixed things about it anyway. It is the flaxseed oil if that makes a difference. It is a solid gold product also.
Flax oil (flaxseed oil/linseed oil) has a lot of Omega 3 EFAs. However, land-based plants (I differentiate because sea plants DO produce long-chain EFAs) contain short-chain EFAs (alpha-linolenic acid). Nothing to sneeze at, and for humans it's even a source of the most beneficial Omega 3s (long chain, like DHA and EPA) because humans can convert plant Omega 3s into long-chain EFAs at a rate of up to 10%.

Tufts discovered in 2005 (I think it was) that dogs cannot.

So for the long-chain Omega 3s, dogs need Omega 3s from marine sources.

There is a company in Australia (I think) that's working on developing a land crop plant that will contain useful levels of DHA in its seeds. As far as I know, this is years from the market.

A few dogs are allergic to flax, so it's probably not a good choice if your dog has food allergies. I do use it myself, and I do give some to my dogs, because I want to maintain a 4-to-1 to 10-to-1 ratio of Omega 6s to Omega 3s. (Omega 6s are plentiful in poultry, eggs, safflower, also flaxseed, hemp oil, and other fats.)

P.S. The question about where wild dogs would get long-chain Omega 3s (or where they ever did get them) is interesting. In fact, it's what a class on canine nutrition I'm taking addresses next, so I'm about to find out. :lol:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,210 Posts
Amanda Layne said:
.....Flax oil is also one of the best-known sources of lignans, which are compounds that are thought to have powerful anti-cancer, antifungal and anti-viral properties ...... Dr Johanna Budwig, a world-renowned scientist and biochemist ..... has been
nominated seven times for the Nobel Prize, for her research on
the connection between cancer and fat metabolism. Dr Budwig’s
book is entitled, “Flax Oil As A True Aid Against Arthritis, Heart
Infarction, Cancer & Other Diseases” .....
Yes, mainstream medicine/nutrition has accepted the benefits of Omega 3 EFAs against most systemic diseases for some time now. Another facet is that OA, diabetes, coronary heart disease, etc., have big components of inflammation, and Omega 3s have potent anti-inflammation properties.

But again, the flax research done by Dr. Johanna Budwig and most others is human-based. It wasn't until recently that it was found that dogs didn't have the conversion mechanism humans do to make flax even more beneficial (and anyway, it's pretty inefficient in humans, too).

I've come to believe that flax is only part of the Omega 3 picture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
So what would you say a good skin/coat oil is? That is really why I give it. I know my friend Lacey gives the Grizzly Salmon Oil, I have thought about getting some that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,210 Posts
Amanda Layne said:
So what would you say a good skin/coat oil is? That is really why I give it. I know my friend Lacey gives the Grizzly Salmon Oil, I have thought about getting some that.
I'm with Lacey.

I give flax and fish oil (no flax for the allergic one), and consider fish oil the more important of the two.

Since I take the same fish oil and use it on salads, I buy pharmaceutical quality (Nordic Naturals, among others) so there's no fish taste or smell, but if it's just for the dogs, Grizzly is a good reasonably-priced choice, IMO.

Not only do my dogs have great skin and coats --- the allergic one's atopic dermatitis also receded with fish oil.

I use a gram per ten pounds of dog weight, which works out to about 1.5 teaspoons for a 70-pound dog.

P.S. Dogs use Vitamin E to process oil supplements.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top