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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I went to my friend's house to take a look at his dog...and I was a bit saddened when I saw my friend. He fell, broke his hip, and has deteriorated physically very much. His relationship with his dog is TIGHT. The dog is impeccable, tough, stable, and beautiful.

I asked to hear the story, and frankly the dog was very respectful in his bite. My friend's (also mature) daughter, teased the dog and the dog responded with FIVE warning "bites" that did not break the skin...even though she was hitting him with a clothes bucket. The final bite was a stronger one, but it only barely broke skin. My friend heard the yelling, he walked as well as he can to his daughter's aid, and saw the dog pulling on his daughter's T-shirt. He went to his dog, put his fingers in the dog's mouth, the dog released immediately, yet continued to bark at the daughter.



I explained to both that the dog never meant to hurt the daughter; that if he had, she would be permanently disabled.

I put on a light bite suit, and armed with a long line, walked into the dog's large enclosure. The dog bit my arm hard, I spoke to him calmly, and waited aproximately 3 minutes for him to release, talking to him the entire time. I then put the leash on, pulled the dog to me, and I sat on a chair and "hung out" for a few minutes while I drank a Coke. The dog started to relax. When he was relaxed, I put a prong collar on and took him for a walk on the street.

So in 8 days, after the local health authorities have cleared the dog, I will have a new dog. I handled him during his original training, and now I will have him back.

Meet Rocket...

 

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Andres Martin said:
So I went to my friend's house to take a look at his dog...and I was a bit saddened when I saw my friend. He fell, broke his hip, and has deteriorated physically very much. His relationship with his dog is TIGHT. The dog is impeccable, tough, stable, and beautiful.

I asked to hear the story, and frankly the dog was very respectful in his bite. My friend's (also mature) daughter, teased the dog and the dog responded with FIVE warning "bites" that did not break the skin...even though she was hitting him with a clothes bucket. The final bite was a stronger one, but it only barely broke skin. My friend heard the yelling, he walked as well as he can to his daughter's aid, and saw the dog pulling on his daughter's T-shirt. He went to his dog, put his fingers in the dog's mouth, the dog released immediately, yet continued to bark at the daughter.



I explained to both that the dog never meant to hurt the daughter; that if he had, she would be permanently disabled.

I put on a light bite suit, and armed with a long line, walked into the dog's large enclosure. The dog bit my arm hard, I spoke to him calmly, and waited aproximately 3 minutes for him to release, talking to him the entire time. I then put the leash on, pulled the dog to me, and I sat on a chair and "hung out" for a few minutes while I drank a Coke. The dog started to relax. When he was relaxed, I put a prong collar on and took him for a walk on the street.

So in 8 days, after the local health authorities have cleared the dog, I will have a new dog. I handled him during his original training, and now I will have him back.

Meet Rocket...

i'd be curious to see how things go andres being that so much of your training philosophy seems to rely on heavy bonding when the dogs are pups. i'd like to see how you approach training without that luxury...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Tim...this dog was already trained. Now it will be a matter of bond and leadership. A little bit of hunger and stress does WONDERS for both. If I HAD to train him though, it works exactly as it would with a puppy except I would have to be careful :lol: :lol: The only differences to me are if there are important time constraints, in which case food, toys, escape training and table training are valuable tools, what the dog's purpose will be, and who will be his definite handler. The latter being the most important.
 

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Andreas, is there an average length of time that it will take for a dog such as this to change his loyalty and bond with you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bob, the dog was already low&wide wagging his tail at me when I left. But to get a strong bond...two weeks if you are good at it. IMO.
 
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