Working Dog Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,973 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What kinds of strategies do you all use to teach aloofness to other dogs? My pup thinks every one of them is one to be played with...she shows no aggression...but she'll react strongly to them on walks, etc.

I'm trying to get her in gear for some of the AKC obedience testing and would like her to chill out when I'm passing a dog on a walk. Is this a correction issue every time until she figures it out? Currently I'm breaking her focus ("Watch me", knee nudge,put her in sit/down) and going onto a correction if she lunges but I'm wondering how I can get her to view other dogs without interest...and if that is practical to train into a 9 m.o. people-happy and dog-happy puppy.

And if this is a right approach, does it sound like I need to ratchet up the distraction and/or correction?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,210 Posts
Woody Taylor said:
What kinds of strategies do you all use to teach aloofness to other dogs? My pup thinks every one of them is one to be played with...she shows no aggression...but she'll react strongly to them on walks, etc. .... I'm trying to get her in gear for some of the AKC obedience testing and would like her to chill out when I'm passing a dog on a walk. Is this a correction issue every time until she figures it out? Currently I'm breaking her focus ("Watch me", knee nudge,put her in sit/down) and going onto a correction if she lunges but I'm wondering how I can get her to view other dogs without interest...and if that is practical to train into a 9 m.o. people-happy and dog-happy puppy. ....And if this is a right approach, does it sound like I need to ratchet up the distraction and/or correction?
Someone else will have to comment on the 9-month-old part.

But maybe I can help with "dog aloofness" for a pet dog. Pets and walks.....now we're talking at my level of expertise! LOL!

For me, it's a bigger picture of focusing on me always when at heel. If there is a wandering of focus, I use a little leash correction and a noise I make ("tch," or I have heard Cesar Millan use "shh"). The leash correction is done before the focus is really gone......the instant it STARTS to wander.

Of course I have had the dogs actually lunge and focus strongly, but my goal (and it's doable, so far in my experience) is to correct way before the lunge ever happens..........at the first sign of focus on the other dog.)

I give my dogs loads of releases from heel, on my terms, by stopping walking and doing a little leash toss thing (like the opposite of a correction.....doesn't matter what your signal is) and the high-pitched "OK!"

At that point the dog has the length of the leash to sniff, pee, wander, etc.

So it is NOT as if the whole walk is military heeling. But the whole heel part IS. Seeing a dog across the street and looking over is enough for me to give a leash correction.

Remember, I'm using a flat collar and my voice. This is no big correction. It's just inflexible. I think (JMO) that it has to be if what you want is focus on you and not on distractions (except at your OK).

This works for me, but I will be interested in what others have to say. I may have just been very lucky with dogs -- or maybe it's just that I don't have much puppy experience.

Oh, and I still do have occasional lapses with one dog who wants to greet every human. But he has improved by about 90% in a few months.

P.S. I find that a brisk walking pace is good! :lol:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,868 Posts
This is all about manners, so I have no problem with compulsion corrections. Just remember, at 9 months, she's still a pup.
I like Connie's advice.
Is your pup just interested in other dogs, or showing aggression? Dog aggresion can sometimes be genetic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
The distraction to other people is only natural for a friendly pup. When training an older dog, I use some of the techniques you already listened, but there is another thing you may want to do. The first step is to teach directions: Left (turn) and right (turn). When the dog is reliably heeling in a straight line, make a slow left turn while putting your right shoulder forward while saying "left". For a right, simply start in a straight line, make a right turn while putting your left shoulder forward and saying "right". The dog will both learn the directional command and learn to watch you for your body language.
You may also want to teach the "leave it" command.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,973 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bob Scott said:
Is your pup just interested in other dogs, or showing aggression? Dog aggresion can sometimes be genetic.
Thanks for all these comments. I guess a primary concern is correcting her for not paying attention to me...if I correct her for not leaving a dog, person alone do I create any defensive problems with her seeing a dog out on a walk (and thinking she'll get corrected or something will hurt?)? When I correct, it's a quick pop--probably not hard enough--and praise as soon as she reverts focus to me. Big problem is her food drive. She's unmotivated by anything to the point of moving her head aside if my hand/treat is in the way of her object of interest...I don't know if vocal praise is enough.

Bob, definitely interested in other dogs. No aggression whatsoever, pure play posturing, high-pitched barking, really bad habit of jumping over smaller dogs but I'm not interpreting that as a dominance thing. She is hugely social with anything that looks like it will play with her. I have never seen her act aggressively toward person or dog.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top