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I've been working on outing and sitting my dog. I've also used a 30 foot line and have outed and sat him successfully at that range. I'm very pleased with the progress. And after I've outed and sat him a couple of times I've recalled him to a heel. No problem.

But when I am standing by him and I command him to heel and begin walking away he re-engages the decoy.

I'd appreciate any input on how I can fix this issue. Thanks,
 

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how many times have you done it with the 30 foot leash? i would say to keep doing reps of that over and over until he gets the routine. then gradually decrease the slack on the leash to 20 feet, 10 feet, 5 feet, then with you right next to him.
 

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How do you turn him away? Ideally you would heel off to the left, keeping yourself between the helper and your dog. If you turn to the right, it's just to much temptation cause the helper is RIGHT THERE now.
 

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Bob Scott said:
How do you turn him away? Ideally you would heel off to the left, keeping yourself between the helper and your dog. If you turn to the right, it's just to much temptation cause the helper is RIGHT THERE now.
Is there a point in the dogs life when you CAN heel the dog away without stepping between the dog and the helper? Is this a training step or should it be like that in trial/high level trial/finished PPD/PSD type scenarios?
 

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Mike, I only train in schutzhund, so I'm not familiar with PPD/PSD. The only time we turn to the right is for proofing the dog. All our work is motivational and once the dog is solid on the turn away with the dog on the outside, we will turn away with the dog in between. As I've said before, our training is motivational. If the dog breaks, the helper stops, the handler stops, and the dog is left to figure out the best place to ge a rebite is at the handlers side. I know it's not everyones cup of tea. I myself have to many years of compulsion training behind me, and it's VERY difficult to just stand there and ignore incorrect behavior, but it DOES work. I've seen a few really serious Sch III dogs with problems that were straightened out simply by ignoring the behavior.......honest! :D
 
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