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The Season 3 opener of The Dog Whisperer includes a **** Hound named Banjo (thank you, Bob Scott, for the reminder!) who spent his formative years in a laboratory cage. He was deemed unadoptable because of his total terror of humans. However, he was adopted, and the new owners spent 4 years with him but had never lessened his fear of people.

CM went to Omaha to see the now six-year-old dog.

From the moment CM backed into the room and then into the kennel with the dog to the opening of a bottle of "**** Urine" (or You-REEN, as CM called it, adding "I don't know how they get it in a bottle"), watering CM eyes and all, it is a segment to remember.

They even used and explained a prong because that was the tool the owners had and used.

It's on again Sunday afternoon.
 

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What Cesar did with Banjo was miraculous. For what, 4 years, the dog had been terrified and would not even come to his owners? And within just a short time the dog was following his female owner in the yard. I didn't so much like the fact that the prong was extremely oversized (when the leash was pulled tight, the chain was pulled all the way through to make the two rings touch, AND the collar was pulled away from the dog's neck by at least an inch to an inch and a half [-X ), and I'd hoped that Cesar would have explained that it needed to be smaller, but he didn't, and that frustrated me. The collar was so big that he easily could slip right out of it (and did). #-o The voice-over guy did sort of explain the collar, saying that Banjo's owners were experienced dog owners (or handlers, or whatever), and all, but experienced dog handlers know better than to have the collar so big.


Man, what did you think about Kisses?! And her owner, too!? :eek: :lol:
 

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I watch the dog whisperer sometimes, mainly because its a show about dogs, BUT Ceasar just doesn't impress me much. I think they find the most idiotic people who haven't got a clue and put THEM on the show. For the majority of the shows that I have seen, what it boils down to is Ceasar telling the people how to tell their dog NO. I tell you what, that was hard, "You mean all I had to do was tell the dog no, wow Ceasar you're a genius." Give me a break. Ok, let me have it, I know I have offended somebody. :)
 

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Overall i think Cezar's show has a positive effect.I do disagree with some of his core philosophy but I think he is a good hand with a dog.Alot of what he does is really just common sense but that is a trait that is becoming more and more scarce these days.

On a common sense tangent;I saw a vet tell all the TV viewers this morning that feeding bones of ANY kind was a terrible idea.With all the years that have passed since humans first started keeping dogs,we sure havent progressed much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Jay, I'm not offended! I do want to say that having gone to his seminars in the olden days :eek: when you still could, before National Geographic made him a "star," I have never seen anyone else with his innate skill level. I think he is part dog.

Now, of course, access to him is expensive and still hard to get anyway, but when he first moved to California and was word-of-mouthed like crazy, fewer than a dozen people with their dogs could attend seminars and work one-on-one with him..... even visit his center in East L.A. when it was first established (a little later on).

Hundreds of miles away from where I live, but worth the drive.

T.V. does not do him justice. They do (of course) choose the entertainment-worthy cases, but it's seeing him in his natural element that's so impressive -- seeing him walking his pack (off lead) of dozens of big powerful dogs.... and no, I am not exaggerating.

Yeah, I know I sound like a groupie. :lol: I was lucky enough to meet him at a perfect time to influence my own handling ability for the better, and I'm still grateful.

Of course, many people here do not do most of their work with pet dogs, so that makes him kind of irrelevant to their work. I do get that! :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Kristen Cabe said:
.....the collar was pulled away from the dog's neck by at least an inch to an inch and a half [-X ), and I'd hoped that Cesar would have explained that it needed to be smaller, but he didn't, and that frustrated me. The collar was so big that he easily could slip right out of it (and did). #-o The voice-over guy did sort of explain the collar, saying that Banjo's owners were experienced dog owners (or handlers, or whatever), and all, but experienced dog handlers know better than to have the collar so big. .......:
Yeah, he actually cares very little about tools, usually using whatever the owner is using (like on the famous e-collar episode), like this time. I think what the voice-over was getting at was that this was what the handlers used, so ..........

He did say that there will be a future episode explaining the e-collar and prong's use.
 

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Connie, I'm just going on what I have seen on tv. Im not saying that he isn't a good person, because he really seems like a good guy and someone that I could get along with. All I've seen him do is work with house pets, it would be neat to see him work and do the things that we do with our dogs. It would be interesting to see how he would train a working dog. Has he ever trained for strict OB, detection, or a protection dog?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
jay lyda said:
Connie, I'm just going on what I have seen on tv. Im not saying that he isn't a good person, because he really seems like a good guy and someone that I could get along with. All I've seen him do is work with house pets, it would be neat to see him work and do the things that we do with our dogs. It would be interesting to see how he would train a working dog. Has he ever trained for strict OB, detection, or a protection dog?
I believe that his basic love, despite his quiet attendance at trials, is working with dogs whose uninformed or unskilled handlers don't get dogs or leadership, and with rehabilitating extremely damaged dogs.

A whole 'nother realm from what most people on this board do; I do understand that.

I do some work with service and alert dogs who have unskilled handlers (and BTW, I consider them to be working dogs), and what he does is very instructive for me, or, I think, to anyone who works with pre-owned and badly-trained dogs and/or with unskilled owners.

But of course I have no idea what's in his future, and I have heard that he works with police departments in So Cal. So who knows? :D
 

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jay lyda said:
Connie, I'm just going on what I have seen on tv. Im not saying that he isn't a good person, because he really seems like a good guy and someone that I could get along with. All I've seen him do is work with house pets, it would be neat to see him work and do the things that we do with our dogs. It would be interesting to see how he would train a working dog. Has he ever trained for strict OB, detection, or a protection dog?
He does refer to working with them in his book.

Unfortunately, I don't think you'll ever see that on TV...I think activists and clicker trainers pretty much line up to send in letters to National Geographic every time they see a prong. The forum sites on him about about as petty and vindictive as you'll ever see...man, don't piss off clicker trainers.

I kind of hope he doesn't ever show working dog issues, really...he does that crap so effortlessly, I can kind of see somebody going out and getting a nice big Presa or Fila and trying to learn via "Caeser's Way" to make him into a PPD.

Pets are his thing, that's what's gonna be most acceptable (and most profitable!) to his company and NG, so I can live with that. It would be cool to get specific examples of him working, uh, working dogs. ;-)

And Connie isn't just a groupie: ask her about her tattoo.
 

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Connie Sutherland said:
Woody Taylor said:
......And Connie isn't just a groupie: ask her about her tattoo.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Watch it, Woody -- you already have a gang of mad Pugs gunning for you!
Better yet, ask Cesar about the tattoo. :twisted: :twisted: :twisted: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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I actually have found it really amazing how many every day folks have watched his show (maybe not religiously like me and Connie, teehee!!), but they still don't get the basic principles. ](*,) I've had a number of behavioral consultations with folks who have watched the show (and I refer to the principles on the show since they are familiar with it) and until someone actually *shows* them, it's like water off a duck's back.

The hardcore "positive only" folks really love to rally around ganging up on him (do they actually watch the show?) and go on and on about how he's nothing new and is reverting dog training 20 years and such (I heard all about this at the APDT conference). I think they may just be kind of jealous deep down that they didn't think of the idea of having a TV show first? :roll: I do appreciate him speaking out against BSL though. That's great!
 

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Jeff, i think that he's got a lot on the ball, anyone who can have a few dozen dogs live together with no problems is more than a good basic trainer. I don't see why he couldn't train a dog in whatever area he tried, JMO,
AL
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
There was no "training" involved in the case of the dog I started the thread about.

At least, not what I would call "good basic trainer" training.
 
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