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IIRC, I've seen this before, on one of those TV video clip programs. I think this interviewer is like a lot of parents, so it certainly clears up the question of why so many kids are bitten. :(
 

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I think I saw that before.... I'm not sure what happened there...

The reporter put his hand on the dogs throat and leaned over him, which is stupid on its own...

However...

This dog is taken to schools and lets kids \"love on him\", what are the chances a kid does this to a dog? Pretty high! Is this the officers fault for not realizing his dog is so reactive? The reporters fault for making a stupid move? Or the dogs fault for doing what he's trained to do?
 

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I'm not a knowledgeable trainer, so this is just my inexperienced opinion. I'd like to hear what those with more experience see.

I don't think either the dog or handler's training is complete. [duh!] He may be more comfortable around children, but this dog appears apprehensive about the guy's attention and not comfortable with being petted and patted on the head. The dog turns toward his handler at one point, seemingly for some kind of reassurance or direction or ?. Right after that, the interviewer puts his hand on the dog's neck and starts to push away as he bends forward - and closer to the dog's face - to stand up. I think those combined actions triggered the dog's response.

I've got a lot of body parts that I prefer to put close to a dog long before I resort to my face. :(
 

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JMHO, but that's a poor read on the part of the handler. He should know his dog better then that if he's going to let someone get in a dominant position with his street dog.
 

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The dog was giving off quite a few signals that he was uncomfortable in the situation. The ears back, looking at his owner, flicking the tongue, ducking his head down when the guy is petting it, etc.

I think his owner should have been able to read him better, but with a TV crew there and with trying to talk and all, he was probably too distracted to notice - I'm not defending him; just explaining maybe why he wasn't watching the dog as closely as he should have been.

I think the reporter should have known better than to put his hands around the dog's face and throat and then lean over him. I don't care if the dog is a police dog or a toy poodle - many, many dogs do not take kindly to that from any person. The dog felt threatened, had given off many signs and signals that he was not comfortable in the situation, and when that didn't work, and this strange person encloses their hands around his throat and leans over him, he did the only thing he felt he could do; he protected himself. If he had meant to do serious harm, he could have.
 

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Kristen Cabe said:
.........I think the reporter should have known better than to put his hands around the dog's face and throat and then lean over him. .....and this strange person encloses their hands around his throat and leans over him, he did the only thing he felt he could do; he protected himself. If he had meant to do serious harm, he could have.
Yes, exactly what toddlers and other children (who are not taught otherwise) do when they run up and hug a strange dog around the neck, obscuring the dog's vision, hearing, and smell, and looming over the dog's head. The reporter didn't have the excuse of being a small child.
 
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