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Good evening.

We desperately need your help.

Chapi-Toy Terrier. He will be 15 years old in March. For the last 2 years he has been sick. We've been to many doctors. They can not diagnose exactly. We live in Georgia. There's no MRI for animals.
They don't do biopsies. The only treatment that helped was Dexamethasone and
Ceftriaxone. We periodically take these medicines, then rest. And so for two years.

Chapi has very enlarged lymph nodes on the left side behind the ear, behind the jaw, and on the neck. Dexamethasone is already not as effective. Two months ago, we accidentally found one on the upper
The vet advised prednisolone but it does not help, by the way chemotherapy is not done for dogs in Georgia.

We send photos of the neoplasm on the jaw, enlarged lymph nodes and the latest tests (on the basis of
Based on these tests the last vet said that it is a multicentric lymphoma).
In general, the dog, given his age, mood and appetite are good.
I understand that it is difficult to diagnose the dog remotely, without all the necessary examinations, but I beg you very much, please help and advise at least some treatment.

Thank you.

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This is probably not the response you are looking for. Your dog, at 15 yo, has lived a long and happy life. Once a cancer goes systemic the prognosis is not very good. Yes, you might buy a little bit of time but the result, at the end, will be the same. We all like to do everything we can for our pets but sometimes it is not in the pet's best interest and can be financially ruinous for the owners. My heartfelt response is to enjoy your pup for the rest of the time he has left and when he tells you he has had enough, the best, kindest, most humane thing you can do is ease his burden and let him cross the Rainbow Bridge. It will be one of the hardest decisions you will have but the right one for him. He will not be alone as 4 of mine would be there waiting for him.
 

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I would ask your vet that question. Some cancers progress slowly until you mess with them and suddenly they take off and are unstoppable. The only ones I would be concerned about are in the mouth and relate to being able to eat and drink with some normalcy. If the vet says it would be a crap shoot and potentially be worse off then accept that. Most vets tend to hedge with the bad news but if they don't approach it with enthusiasm but are hesitant and seem to ponder it for a long time, then the risks are probably more to the negative than positive. You also need to consider how an aged dog will handle anesthesia and the recovery especially with the mouth. Large holes may be the result and no way to close them up so now you have a new problem. Talk with your vet. Ask them to be honest with you even though it may not be good news and take it from there.
 

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first, it's very distressing that you weren't able to get a MRI or biopsy done. as Sarah has already stated, be happy for the years you've had and face the reality that it is probably time to say goodbye. i guess pet owners will never really understand what quality of life means for their animals. it is just plain selfish to prolong a life of misery and try to somehow rationalize they are still happy just to be alive. you have the ability to let your dog find peace.....sooner or later i hope you realize this and then honor the life he had and forever be thankful for those years. i have been there, i know the sorrow you have now
 

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just for the record, please consider home euthanasia. i will never again take one of my pets to a vet office and lay them down on some stainless slab to be killed.

i finally did it right with my last dog. we had a nice big dinner for him with his favorite food and with only his close friends around. it was hard for everyone to choke back the tears when it was time to sedate him, but it was a very peaceful, moving experience and a fitting tribute to the great dog he was
 
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