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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can those of you who know how...explain how you train the pit (for KNPV) and the broad jump in Ring?

In PRECISE DETAIL?

:lol:
 

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we have a learningpit which starts small and gets broader till the right size.

If the dog knows the other jumps we learn the pit. Someone else hold the dog, boss on the other side and calls the dog, rewards the dog when it is with the boss. The long leash prevents that the dog goes around the pit. A few times over and back, the every time a bit broader till we are at the broadest side.
At that time dog gets the command "breed" en we start at perfecting the tecnique of jumping, by lying something a stick or something across the jump in the middle. A bit higher (30 cm) than the pit, the dogs jumping thecnique gets better this way.
At first with some help to get the dog in the middle on the other side.

Because the most work is already done with the other jumps, a dog gets this all very quickly.

details enough?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
details enough?
Well...what do you do to get the dog to jump over and then stop and sit at an adequate distance, in preparation to jump back?

Jumping to follow the owner is the easy part.

The devil is in the details. :twisted:
 

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first the jump is to the owner, later from the owner to the one who helps :wink:

And later on:if they get the idea of what is meant...they have to do it...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm at the 3.5 meter mark with my pup...a 19 month old Dutchie. It has not been difficult at all so far.

Anyhow, I would appreciate tips for getting my dog to commit to the longer jumps. How do I teach my dog to measure his stride length? What is proper stride length for the long jump preparation? From how far should the dog start? Also, I would like to know how my pup compares in his long jump distance with other dogs his age.

BTW, it's a beautiful sight to watch a dog leap into the air like they do in long jumps. 8)
 

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In any jumping, it's a good idea to observe/video the dog from the side numerous times to determine the dogs stride. That can give you a good idea of stride and ideal take of point.
I enjoy watching dock dog diving. the record is 26+ feet, held by a Border Collie.
If there are any dock dog competitors here, they could give better explinations.
Equestrian folks could help also.
 

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In training horses to jump different obsticles.....the rule of thumb is that the takeoff point should be the same distance from the base of the jump as the jump is high. In other words.....if the jump is 3 feet in hight the ideal take off point should be 3 feet from the base of the jump. To encourage this in early training a pole is placed in front of the jump the appropriate distance from the jump. This way the horse will take off at the pole & then clear the jump. This prevents the horse from coming in too close to the fence & also the horse will not want to step on the pole & will take off before it. I used this same method with my dogs in teaching the jump. In teaching an oxer (a wide jump as oposed to a verticle, straight up jump)) comcept to a horse....you use the same method....as for a verticle but increase the width of the obsticle gradually. Horses don't have visusal depth perception the way we do....they actually see 'flat'. A horse coming into a jump....sees the jump & sizes it up & then basically 'jumps blind'. He does not see the jump after a certain distance. This may be due to their monocular vision. They see seperately out of each eye & do not have bonocular vision as we do. Their right & left brain lobes are also not connected like ours are. If they see something for the 1st time with one eye & then see it with the other eye, they are seeing it again for the 1st time. They also don't see right in front of them....their front vision is about 2 feet in front of them. Any closer & they don't see it, they sense & smell an object. Weird I know....so now that you know how horses see their world, you can have a new appreciation for horses that jump those big sold jumps & we riders that put 'complete trust' their equine partners.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Anne,
Stride length for a collected horse on a normal jumping course is around four meters, and could get up to 5 meters on a faster/broader course. Those numbers are pretty standard for horses.
I'm wondering if anyone here knows those numbers for dogs...as they apply for a long jump, which has very little height, and thus the takeoff point can be quite close. I'm sure if there are any Ring people here, they would know.
Curiously, when dogs do the very tall vertical jumps, the takeoff point can be quite close as well, because they almost "run" up the obstacle.
 

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Andres, I was refering to the retreive jump not the wall when I was talking about the distance from the bottom of the jump for the take off point.....With the tall wall in 'Ring' they will tend to leap up & then walk up the wall to scale something of that size. A 'normal' sized horse will have a collected stride of 12 feet. Of course this may change do to the larger or small overall size of the horse or for some horses that tend to have longer or shorter strides due to their 'way of going'. Dogs, at least mine, seem to have about a 1 1/2 - 2 ft or so stride at a lope. Again, this will depend on the size & overall body length & way of going that each dog has. My female has a very long swinging stride ( like a dressage horse) that swings from the shoulder....my male has a shorter choppyer, stabby stride. He doesn't have the shoulder swing that she has. Again body length & overall conformation just like horses, comes into play here, also. And you are correct that many dogs will come in closer to take off for a wider obstacle...but not all of them & also the speed with which they run up to the base of the broad jump will also come into play as to the appropriate take off spot. You should train the basics to the dog & then once they 'get it' they will make the adjustment that they need to make to clear the obsticle. So there are many variables, as in most things in life.
 
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