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I use kelp but I buy the cheap stuff that's meant for sprinkling on grass. Anybody else do this? Is there really a difference between this and kelp marketed for consumption? It's just dried kelp broken down into small particles.

Has anybody seen a definite difference in the dog's condition using kelp? If so what brand did you use? A long time ago I remember having a dog that was eating grass. I started him on kelp and within two weeks he stopped eating grass. But this is far from a scientific approach and was a long time ago so I can't remember all the details. The brand however was kelpmate which was one of the first on the market but is no longer in existence.
 

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I use kelp but I buy the cheap stuff that's meant for sprinkling on grass. Anybody else do this?...
No.... As posted above, arsenic is extremely common in kelp. Not only would I not do this, but I would not buy kelp products, including those meant for consumption, that are not outside-tested for heavy metals.
 

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Even though the following link is about people that used kelp as a supplement...it definitely has me a little concerned about the kelp I'm giving my dogs. Any thoughts?

http://www.ehponline.org/members/2007/9495/9495.html
We have been using kelp for a couple dogs that are stool eaters though there are many other benefits. This is the information on the product distributor http://alaskansalmonoil.com/KELP%20data%20sheet.htm I'll ask them about testing for arsenic and other chemicals. I'd steer away from products unless approved for consumption.
 

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Connie, are you continuing with this brand?
http://www.seaveg.com/products.php

Yes.

QUOTE: You may wonder why Maine Coast Sea Vegetables went to the trouble and expense to become certified organic by OCIA, particularly as we already tested our dried plants for the absence of heavy metals, herbicides, pesticides, and microbiological contaminants. It's true that compared to land plants, we have little control over the growing conditions (growth environment) of our wild marine plants. But we do have choices about how, when, where, and how much we harvest - as well as how the plants are transported, dried, stored and packaged. END QUOTE

When I emailed them in 2007, they supplied the test report.

A local natural food store carries it. It's cheap.

I like to give a whole food when possible, too, as opposed to a powder. Also, I really like a couple of their products.

The way it's "preserved" is with sea salt, so I dump the bag of stuff into cold water first until it's not salty-tasting any more.

The dogs love it. OTOH, they love pretty much everything.
 

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Connie, are you continuing with this brand?
http://www.seaveg.com/products.php

Yes.

QUOTE: You may wonder why Maine Coast Sea Vegetables went to the trouble and expense to become certified organic by OCIA, particularly as we already tested our dried plants for the absence of heavy metals, herbicides, pesticides, and microbiological contaminants. It's true that compared to land plants, we have little control over the growing conditions (growth environment) of our wild marine plants. But we do have choices about how, when, where, and how much we harvest - as well as how the plants are transported, dried, stored and packaged. END QUOTE

When I emailed them in 2007, they supplied the test report.

A local natural food store carries it. It's cheap. I like to give a whole food when possible, too, as opposed to a powder. Also, I really like a couple of their products myself, like one called (I think) "mixed sea vegetables."

The way it's "preserved" is with sea salt, so I dump the bag of stuff into cold water first until it's not salty-tasting any more.

The dogs love it. OTOH, they love pretty much everything.
 

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This is it right?



I would get the 1lb bag for better value, how many days is that good for a 110lb dog?

Is this stuff powder or what? I can't see you putting the powder in water. Are you saying that it comes in leaves? If so how do you measure how much to give a dog?

You do this because you don't like it when it's ground? Thanks.
 

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I would get the 1lb bag for better value, how many days is that good for a 110lb dog?

Is this stuff powder or what? I can't see you putting the powder in water. Are you saying that it comes in leaves? If so how do you measure how much to give a dog?

You do this because you don't like it when it's ground? Thanks.
It is the actual thing as it comes out of the water. It is not powdered. It's like lettuce. It's like the dulse, kelp, etc., that people eat dried in little snack bags and that they make sushi with, but it's not dried. (My father bought dried dulse frequently when I was a kid, having acquired a taste for in in the Marines. So I grew up having it around. That form, however, is very salty, and that might've been a big part of its appeal.)

Because it's an actual food and not a concentrate (dried, powdered), I don't much care if I measure it. I throw a little into the dish. They don't get it every day.

My original reason for getting this form and brand was the testing when arsenic (and mercury, lead, and cadmium) contamination started showing up in sea vegetables all over the world instead of just in the most industrialized countries.

But now I also like it because it tastes good and because it's leafy green food.
 

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Just curious, someone today told me that kelp wasnt something she would give to her dogs b/c of its effect on the thyroid... I haven't looked into it myself yet,and i plan on doing so, just wanted to see what you guys thought....
 
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