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Call me the Lone Ranger, it won't hurt my feelings. I didn't see a problem with the dog in this video. It looks to me as if he's never bitten anyone who wasn't wearing some kind of equipment or presenting an arm to be bitten. This isn't the dog's fault. It's that of his trainer.

My own dog did this on his first outing with a real suspect. He ran up to him, looking for gear and when it wasn't present, looked beyond him for someone who was holding a sleeve. When he didn't see him, he continued to run alongside the suspect as no one else was in the picture. That wasn't my fault or that of my dog, rather the blame lays with the trainers who didn't properly prepare us for the street.
 

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Lou Castle said:
Call me the Lone Ranger, it won't hurt my feelings. I didn't see a problem with the dog in this video. It looks to me as if he's never bitten anyone who wasn't wearing some kind of equipment or presenting an arm to be bitten. This isn't the dog's fault. It's that of his trainer.

My own dog did this on his first outing with a real suspect. He ran up to him, looking for gear and when it wasn't present, looked beyond him for someone who was holding a sleeve. When he didn't see him, he continued to run alongside the suspect as no one else was in the picture. That wasn't my fault or that of my dog, rather the blame lays with the trainers who didn't properly prepare us for the street.
i was thinking the same thing. unfortunately, that scenario in the video is not all that uncommon. you hear MANY stories about how dogs, especially young dogs, don't engage a suspect the first time they are ordered to do so. realizing that, it's the handler and trainer's responsibility to ensure that they give the dog the best opportunity to succeed by addressing this possibility in training.
 
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