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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you think a "hard" handler on a young dog can intimidate the dog to the point where not only is the dog afraid of its handler but that it also loses its confidence to engage a decoy?

I'm not talking about a handler that is just outright abusive of his dog. I'm talking about a well-intentioned handler that loves his dog but is so strict and "hard" with the dog that not only does the handler NOT advance the dog, he sets it back.

Your thoughts? Thanks.
 

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Do you think a "hard" handler on a young dog can intimidate the dog to the point where not only is the dog afraid of its handler but that it also loses its confidence to engage a decoy?

I'm not talking about a handler that is just outright abusive of his dog. I'm talking about a well-intentioned handler that loves his dog but is so strict and "hard" with the dog that not only does the handler NOT advance the dog, he sets it back.

Your thoughts? Thanks.

Yes. Heavy compulsion during the training of an exercise can create problems (focus problems) during the exercise.

I've pinch-hit (or pinch-handled) so the TD could take the handler out of the mix and see whether grip improved.

Edit: I was talking about adults; didn't notice this was in the puppy section.
 

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Absolutely! Strict/hard handling will cause the sensitive young dog to be more concerned with doing what he thinks the handler wants instead of freely engaging the decoy. In the case of the dog who finally gets fed up with being in conflict, the handler might find the dog coming up the leash.

I too am an "Amateur Working Dog Enthusiast" but have seen this type of things with some people and their dogs. Not good. :(
 

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I'd also add that, IMHO, heavy handed or unfare correction is more the cause of handler aggressive dogs then genetics.
Just because a person has a serious, tough dog doesn't mean it has to be handled in a serious, tough way.
 

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I must admit I have this problem. I am a large and very loud boistrus person and I have to be very careful with body language and voice tone when handling young dogs. It is something I really want to reduce and become a better handler and decoy. It works for and against me in both situations. If I can Soften my image to the dog then I can work softer not so confident young dogs and build them up. The testing and placing pressure on the dog isnt something I have a problem with, but to be a good well rounded handler and decoy one ust be able to change his persona and image with each dog to tailor to thier needs and abilities.
 

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1 of the reasons why we don´t train with a very young dog. Serious training starts with dogs 8 mo. or older. Before that: play, see things in their own time, potty train and learn 2 things: their name (name= look at me) and Hier (come). First with threat, later ´cause they have to come no matter what.

The hardest iron can break....
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I was too hard on my dog and, frankly, still am at times. Live and learn I suppose. I'll be better with my next dog.
 

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I was too hard on my dog and, frankly, still am at times. Live and learn I suppose. I'll be better with my next dog.
I think most of us have been there. In particular us "older" folks.
I ruined (ef his neck up) a really great competition dog 25 + yrs ago. To heavy handed and to demanding on simple day to day control. One of the big reasons I now train totally motivational, and love it, I might add!
STILL learninig!
I also agree with Jeff that it will take MAJOR efort on your part. My TD still wont let me do ob work with a leash on my dog. To many years of yank and crank to eliminate all the impulse bs. :oops:
 
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