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Has anyone had success with two intact males of similar age and size living peacefully in the house together? I am thinking with the proper precautions taken, of course...i.e. each individual dog has bonded with the owner, been properly trained, are seperated when owner isn't around, and has 'grown up together' (rather than two adult males being introduced from the get go). I might get a puppy soon and I am not sure what I would rather deal with...two males with the possibility of them fighting or a male and a female and the horrendous amount of whining, scratching, and screaming I will have to deal with twice a year during the estrus season.

My dog is aggressive to strange dogs (he doesn't differentiate between sexes) but very tolerant with my family's dogs, which include two intact males. They're not allowed to pack together, only interact with supervision, so we've never had a dog fight, but I wonder if it will be different with a much bigger male.

From your experiences, do you believe proper leadership will prevent disputes?
 

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I did it for years with multiple terrieres. Kerries, Norwich, Borders, Bull, Pit, and JRT.
Terrier people were constantly telling me I was nuts but I never had a problem except for my current JRT. I had hunted with both parents, all four G-parents. All great dogs except for his psycho mom. I wanted a hunting dog from these lines. Guess who's genetics my dog got?!! Crazy mom's.
I don't blame the breed, just the breeding.
I still run him together with my GSDs but only under supervision.
Controlling a "pack" is more about leadership then training.
I have also ran multiple dogs and bitches together. Obviously not during heat cycles.
 

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From your experiences, do you believe proper leadership will prevent disputes?
Prevent, yes, but it's never out of the range of possibility, of course. I've fostered dozens of dogs (intact and fixed males and females) and it's more the personality of the dog than the hormones. Zoso (neutered at 4 months) and a number of neutered males that were fairly dominant and/or combative with other dogs while I've had intact males who were big babies. Training, personality, genes, and hormonal exposure during fetal development is as important if not more so than their current hormonal status. If they are okay around you and you have good leadership, they will probably be okay not around you, but it's not guaranteed.
 

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LOL, talk about march of the penguins...

I also think it also depends on if their exercise needs are being met. I'd like to visit Cesar Millan's facility with his well-exercised pack and see how often a fight breaks out between the intact pit bulls.
 
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