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Hi Connie, I feed Arkane canned mackeral, as well as some fresh frozen fish, as we have previously discussed. I was cleaning out my cupboards today & discovered about 20 cans of White Tuna packed in Water. They are only about 6 months old. I don't care for tuna & was wondering if I could feed it to my pup?
 

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susan tuck said:
Hi Connie, I feed Arkane canned mackeral, as well as some fresh frozen fish, as we have previously discussed. I was cleaning out my cupboards today & discovered about 20 cans of White Tuna packed in Water. They are only about 6 months old. I don't care for tuna & was wondering if I could feed it to my pup?
I would use it a little at a time, well-rinsed (because it has no much salt added).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Maybe I would be better off donating it to shelter. I am taking down a bunch of canned goods that are perfectly fine, but I know I will not be using. Anyway, canned mackeral is so cheap!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Martin,
Once a week usually. I have a lot of friends that fish, & they know I feed raw stuff, so when they are cleaning out their freezers they bring me what ever they think they won't get around to eating. Sometimes I open a can of Mackeral for him. How about you?
 

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susan tuck said:
Hi Martin,
Once a week usually. I have a lot of friends that fish, & they know I feed raw stuff, so when they are cleaning out their freezers they bring me what ever they think they won't get around to eating. Sometimes I open a can of Mackeral for him. How about you?
Me too, either frozen raw or canned or cooked..... I don't do not-frozen raw because I have parasite-phobia. :lol:

Previously-frozen raw is what I usually have around.
 

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Reminder: No raw Pacific northwest salmonids (salmon, trout, fish that goes into fresh water to spawn) because of salmon poisoning (apparently a problem only to canids).

It's only raw, and only Pacific northwest.
 

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For humans at least, it all depends on how it is prepared. The pesticides and the heavy metals accumulate in the fat of the animal (which is how most things are bioaccumulated) and so the reason bears eat a lot of salmon and haven't been effected by endocrine disruptors as much is because they apparently strip off the skin and a lot of the fat. So if you are going to make salmon for your own meal, grilling it so the fat runs off is better than pan frying (where it cooks in the contaminants). If you avoid the fat, it's not as bad. Or so says my faculty adviser, one of the leading experts on environmental endocrine disruption.
 

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Maren Bell Jones said:
For humans at least, it all depends on how it is prepared. The pesticides and the heavy metals accumulate in the fat of the animal (which is how most things are bioaccumulated) and so the reason bears eat a lot of salmon and haven't been effected by endocrine disruptors as much is because they apparently strip off the skin and a lot of the fat. So if you are going to make salmon for your own meal, grilling it so the fat runs off is better than pan frying (where it cooks in the contaminants). If you avoid the fat, it's not as bad. Or so says my faculty adviser, one of the leading experts on environmental endocrine disruption.
That's my interpretation too. That's why fish oil should be distilled -- because otherwise it's where the heavy metals are concentrated.

I think salmon is usually grilled or broiled; I've never seen it fried, but who knows? This is a fryin' country! :lol: But wild salmon is far lower in heavy metals and other contaminants than tuna, shark, and other big high-on-the-chain fish.
http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~frf/sea-mehg.html
 

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I think I've cooked salmon pan fried a time or two. Not deep fat fried, but just put the fillet in a sauce pan with a bit of olive oil and carefully turn til done. But yes, I mostly broil it (making sure the drippings are caught under the broiler pan) or grill it. I got a fish basket thingy for a wedding gift and I like it! Takes a wee bit longer to cook, but it keeps it intact better.
 

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Maren Bell Jones said:
For humans at least, it all depends on how it is prepared. The pesticides and the heavy metals accumulate in the fat of the animal (which is how most things are bioaccumulated) and so the reason bears eat a lot of salmon and haven't been effected by endocrine disruptors as much is because they apparently strip off the skin and a lot of the fat.
I watched a documentary a couple years ago on bears and the salmon run. In this it showed the bears stripping off the skin, but it was so they could eat the skin/fat only. Get the most "bang for the buck" in calories vs amount ate. Since fish are so plentiful during the run, they were leaving behind most of the meat and eating only the "best" parts (skin, head and roe in females). In leaner times they eat the entire fish.

I grew up on the Southern Oregon coast, and we ate salmon on a regular basis. Pan fried, poached, baked, grilled, you name it. Yum :) Occasionally you heard of a dog (ours or a neighbors) who got salmon poisoning from eating fish along the riverbank, but they usually got over it with a round of antibiotics, and I was always told once they had it, they wouldn't get it again. Not sure if that's true or not.

I feed my dogs salmon on a semi-regular basis. I find it labeled for chowder in the grocery store, usually it's whats left after they have cut the fish into steaks, the parts that they couldn't get large "pretty" steaks from. Most of my dogs love it, a couple aren't interested. But none have had any problems from eating it.
 

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There's no problem I know of with salmon from any other area. But raw salmon from the Pacific northwest has the potential to be deadly to dogs (and wolves, etc.).

Almost all dogs who are infected die unless they're treated pretty fast. You're 100% correct about the antibiotics. The trick is to catch it, know what it is, and tell the vet so the appropriate treatment is used immediately.

I'll dig up a source. If nothing else, I have a canine nutrition book somewhere with salmon poisoning in it.

That's interesting about the bears.
 

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Kadi Thingvall said:
I watched a documentary a couple years ago on bears and the salmon run. In this it showed the bears stripping off the skin, but it was so they could eat the skin/fat only. Get the most "bang for the buck" in calories vs amount ate. Since fish are so plentiful during the run, they were leaving behind most of the meat and eating only the "best" parts (skin, head and roe in females). In leaner times they eat the entire fish.
Yeah, that's what I had originally thought was that they stripped off the flesh and fat and left most of the rest in preparation for hibernation, but my faculty advisor said that they don't? I am not sure...like I've seen multiple studies on large marine mammals like orca whales and belugas that have a TON of endocrine disrupting chemicals like PCBs and heavy metals in their fat stores because they eat the whole fish, but nothing on grizzly bears that eat salmon almost exclusively before they go into hibernation. Maybe I'll ask him again.
 

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I did a google search on "bear salmon strip skin" and got a number of hits

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=bear+salmon+strip+skin

A lot of it isn't scientific papers, but just first hand observations from people that have gone to photograph bears during a salmon run. But they all mention the bears eating the skin. Sometimes along with the rest of the body, other times just the skin.
 
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