Working Dog Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never fed any of my past dogs turkey. Is it okay?

Why haven't I, because of L-Tryptophan which turkey contains. I'm very unsure what to think about turkey. Anyway, Does turkey affect canines in any good or bad way?

Can turkey be a replacement for chicken as the RMB of the diet?
Do the bones differ in any structural way compared to chicken bones?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
i've heard not to feed turkey, but it is in quite a few foods so I was wondering if it turkey's ill-effects were just a myth. Connie :-\"
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
L-Tryptophan in humans has the effect to help produce serotonin in your body. Serotonin plays a role in regulating receptors. Turkey to me is like a sleeping pill. If I eat any loaded or rich carb loaded food, good luck trying to wake me up from my nap. :)

I have no clue if turkey has any ill effects on canines. I'd eventually love to get a 1400 page book on canine brain and neurochemistry.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,210 Posts
I feed turkey on a regular basis, and have never had a problem. Mainly necks and backs, but during the holiday season when they are so danged cheap I usually pick up a couple of whole turkeys to chop up and feed to the dogs.
I know many people who feed turkey, once the relative size is taken into consideration.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,210 Posts
L-Tryptophan in humans has the effect to help produce serotonin in your body. Serotonin plays a role in regulating receptors. Turkey to me is like a sleeping pill. If I eat any loaded or rich carb loaded food, good luck trying to wake me up from my nap. :)

I have no clue if turkey has any ill effects on canines. I'd eventually love to get a 1400 page book on canine brain and neurochemistry.
L-Tryptophan is the least plentiful amino acid, but it is abundant in chicken, eggs, turkey, some cheeses, and other foods (pork, too).

In order to induce sleepiness in a canid, it would have to be fed alone (not the meat.... the L-Tryptophan), with no other amino acids. In other words, it would have to be an L-Tryptophan supplement.

Maybe Maren can explain the reason in twenty words or fewer, but I can't. That was all I wrote down in my notes for a canine nutrition class.:oops:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
L-Tryptophan is the least plentiful amino acid, but it is abundant in chicken, eggs, turkey, some cheeses, and other foods (pork, too).

In order to induce sleepiness in a canid, it would have to be fed alone (not the meat.... the L-Tryptophan), with no other amino acids. In other words, it would have to be an L-Tryptophan supplement.

Maybe Maren can explain the reason in twenty words or fewer, but I can't. That was all I wrote down in my notes for a canine nutrition class.:oops:
If so, I don't see a problem with giving turkey to dogs. What about the turkey bones?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,548 Posts
Ha ha, Connie, as if I paid attention in my biochemistry class! ;)

I've fed turkey for a while. Turkey wings are a nice size for larger dogs and for dogs who are gulpers. Even my gulper has to work on them for a while because of their weird size and shape. Ground turkey is fed once or twice a week no problems and is cheaper than ground beef. Turkey is in a lot of types of kibble anyways (used to feed Chicken Soup and still feed the canned every once in a while as a Kong filler and it had turkey in it). I don't see a problem, other than the crazy selective breeding for those turkeys and their big boobs.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top