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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Several times a week after work, and on the weekend... is very exhausting... As I type I'm waiting on my body to loosen up and eyes to finish opening so I can go do the daily grind... Any other helpers in this situation? Does it wear on you? My body is definitely taking a beating. Tips?
 

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i've only been catching real dogs for a few years, but i found it just the opposite from what you are saying.

barring a physical injury, i had less aches and pains as i improved basic techniques, since i started out with the mind set i was just cannon fodder

- started going with the flow, got better footwork and stopped trying to manhandle a dog that was often stronger than i was
- also helped to learn how to absorb a takedown when knocked off my feet
- more breaks when it was hot and humid helped a lot too //lol//

no comment on bruises tho :)
.... but some people bruise more easily than others
 

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I've only been doing helper work for a little over a year, but I've gotta agree with Rick. The work gets easier the more dogs you work. If your body is taking a beating maybe you need to hit the health club a bit?:cry:

Sorry couldn't help the last part.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i've only been catching real dogs for a few years, but i found it just the opposite from what you are saying.

barring a physical injury, i had less aches and pains as i improved basic techniques, since i started out with the mind set i was just cannon fodder

- started going with the flow, got better footwork and stopped trying to manhandle a dog that was often stronger than i was
- also helped to learn how to absorb a takedown when knocked off my feet
- more breaks when it was hot and humid helped a lot too //lol//

no comment on bruises tho :)
.... but some people bruise more easily than others
It gets easier yes, but lets say, doing an escape bite, or working grip... I'm about 140lbs. When 90 lbs is hanging on to me whether im escaping or driving, no amount of technique can make it easy... And while I feel I've gotten very smooth catching dogs in courage tests, when 90lbs sticks to you at 30mph there is still a lot of strain on the body... Do it 20 times in a night and its that much more.

I'm not getting hurt directly, but for example, I've got a knee that's been agitating me... I think mostly from the initial acceleration in an escape.

I'm actually in great health.
 

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It gets easier yes, but lets say, doing an escape bite, or working grip... I'm about 140lbs. When 90 lbs is hanging on to me whether im escaping or driving, no amount of technique can make it easy... And while I feel I've gotten very smooth catching dogs in courage tests, when 90lbs sticks to you at 30mph there is still a lot of strain on the body... Do it 20 times in a night and its that much more.

I'm not getting hurt directly, but for example, I've got a knee that's been agitating me... I think mostly from the initial acceleration in an escape.

I'm actually in great health.
it will take its toll :) it gets easier but over time but impacts, strains and loads take their toll...anyone who says different will change their answers when they are a little older :)

ankles too, LOL...

even just with sleeve work, injuries will happen eventually as well. suit work more often I think personally...

even without major injuries trauma happens...thighs/biceps get torn up, elbows/knees get crunched and munched on...etc. etc.a nice bite on the wrist or hand tucked in the suit feels great too :)

rinse and repeat for 10-15-20 years, and like I said..it takes its toll





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You answered your own question. Just like any other phyiscal activity without proper rest between sessions you do not give yourself time to repair and heal. You say you work dogs several times a week plus weekends and IMO here lies the problem. Scale back and give your body a chance to catch it's breath.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You answered your own question. Just like any other phyiscal activity without proper rest between sessions you do not give yourself time to repair and heal. You say you work dogs several times a week plus weekends and IMO here lies the problem. Scale back and give your body a chance to catch it's breath.
well, right now its really twice a week total... I do some stuff with my own, or help an individual out here or there... what kills me is when the weather is perfect and everyone shows up except the other helpers lol

Its minor crap too.. like working grip using leather... my hands *kill* after that

I was hoping there were some "eat a banana and a can of tuna before and after" or "mainline a multivitamin that night" type of "it helps" stuff... I don't think anyone can stop the inevitable "my body isn't 18 years old anymore"
 

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The constant contact and collisions will take you toll no matter what shape you are in. You also have to think smarter when you train.

Stretching before training sessions. Use of compression braces for your knee,calf, shoulder, back support KT tape, Chiropractor visits. Soaking in Epson Salt is your best friend. Arnica gel, should buy stock in the company....Use to laugh at one helper who would spray Ice hot before working dogs.. now I am in the situation, I am doing the same things he use to. Sucks getting older. The best thing is rest.
 

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The constant contact and collisions will take you toll no matter what shape you are in. You also have to think smarter when you train.

Stretching before training sessions. Use of compression braces for your knee,calf, shoulder, back support KT tape, Chiropractor visits. Soaking in Epson Salt is your best friend. Arnica gel, should buy stock in the company....Use to laugh at one helper who would spray Ice hot before working dogs.. now I am in the situation, I am doing the same things he use to. Sucks getting older. The best thing is rest.
+1. warm up, cool down, stretch, hot bath, massage and an early night. Wow, I am getting old. I make my old man sound like a wild thing!!
 

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Stretching isn't enough. A complete set of warmup exercises before you work is a must. Jumping jacks all the way to 5 wind sprints. I worked a large club and I think the record was 80 dogs on a Sunday. I worked dogs (Ring, PP, PSD) at least 4 days a week starting when I was 35. Until I started completely warming up I was a wreck and usually gassed out after 10 dogs. Never had many aches or pains (besides the bruising :-o) after that. My 2 cents.
 

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Take a tip from Elmar Mannes.

He was around 50 yrs old when I met him for the first time. He was director of a bank.

Someone asked him how he could take on so many dogs at an event. He answered:

I let the dogs work.

I guess brains go before muscles.

I couldn't do it so don't think I'm being big-headded.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Stretching isn't enough. A complete set of warmup exercises before you work is a must. Jumping jacks all the way to 5 wind sprints. I worked a large club and I think the record was 80 dogs on a Sunday. I worked dogs (Ring, PP, PSD) at least 4 days a week starting when I was 35. Until I started completely warming up I was a wreck and usually gassed out after 10 dogs. Never had many aches or pains (besides the bruising :-o) after that. My 2 cents.
I shall try that... i stretch right now, and get moving around, but not what I would call "warm up exercises"
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Take a tip from Elmar Mannes.

He was around 50 yrs old when I met him for the first time. He was director of a bank.

Someone asked him how he could take on so many dogs at an event. He answered:

I let the dogs work.

I guess brains go before muscles.

I couldn't do it so don't think I'm being big-headded.
I assume by that he meant, he doesn't fight the dog constantly... I don't do that myself... a) can't, I don't weigh enough that it could last, and b) largely owing to many years of studying jiu jitsu, I understand the merit of not meeting force with direct force.
 

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It is not only the stretching and warm up. You need to do additional exercises that complement and help the decoy work in between. Look at some of the things that some of the top decoys do. Look at Marcus Hampton. Ask him what he does – look at some of the videos that he has posted.
 
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