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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My daughtet has rescued a female Greyhound, she is somewhere between 11 to 15 mo old.
She was rescued off a private ranch out in what we call the Flint Hills.
(out in the middle of no where )
There had been a male and this female and we tryed to get them both but the Greyhound rescue failed us badly and didn't even return our calls the day they promissed to meet us to pick up the dogs. My daughter drove almost 350 miles to get them trying to keep this ranch owner from shooting them. But when the rescue didn't call and didn't show up she was only able -- sadly to get one dog.
The male was shot and killed.
My daughter has the female and she is very frightened and shy but for a dog that has never been in a house be before doing very will.
Doing great around the other dogs and once she warmed up to us is very gentle.

I have been trying to get help with getting her spay and first vet check up.

I was told be the Humane S of KS they wont help with or have anything to do with a Greyhound and today said to go to the Greyhond rescue. The same one that has already not helped.
There reason was that Greyhounds have speacial health needs,

Do any of you know anything about this?

When I was talking with the rescue in the begining they where asking question about the ear tatoos and where demanding an adderss to the ranch. Something I didn't have and that mad her up set.

The rescue was also worried that the dogs where Coyote dog? never heard of that either.
But guess the Greyhound is also bred and raised and even ear tagged for running coyotes so the rescue was worried that these dogs where coyotes dogs.

To me that still doesnt make sence a Grehound is a Grehound and a rescue should be able to at least be honest and not say they are going to do something and then not.
Just a little ranting little sorry

Anyone know anything?

If we are going to foster or keep this dog I need more infor if these dogs are this fragile.

thanks
 

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Hi Valerie, There is more than one greyhound rescue organization. I would perhaps google & then contact another one of the group. Also, Connie (moderator on this board) knows tons about rescue/health issues. You should send her a pm.
 

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Are you guys from Kansas I assume? I was at a dog show in the spring and I got to talking to a lady with a ton of salukis (she had like 8 or 9 in tow). I casually started asking her if any mushers had ever approached her because a lot of the sighthounds are used in Alaskan husky crosses and that sort of thing. She said no, but she said she had been asked if she would sell some as coyote dogs, so yes, I guess I had heard of that as well. Not sure how legal that is, but anyways...if you guys are from Kansas, one of the foster coordinators of the shelter I volunteer and foster for has some good contacts with Rescued Racers out in St. Louis. If you can get her out to Columbia, I could do transport into St. Louis if they approve it:

http://www.rescuedracers.com/contact/adoptContact.asp
 

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yes I have heard that sighthounds are sensitive to anesthesia. So that is the "health problem" the vet is probably concerned about. Other than that, as far as I know Greyhounds are very healthy, the breed is 99% free of hip dysplasia, they usually have nice temperaments and are excellent choices for elderly people - they are quiet, rarely bark, are not destructive, not usually aggressive to other dogs, not extremely playful so maybe not the "retrieve a ball and wrestle with" dog that kids might like to have. They are ok with smaller dogs and cats as long as they are exposed to them and taught not to chase them. They can never be off leash (unless they are obedience trained or on e-collar), do need to run sometimes because they love to - are sensitive to heat and cold weather, and do need a soft place to sleep (like your couch). They are very clean dogs and extremely easy to housebreak even as adults. They are crate-trained already if they came from the track, so a thick bed inside a large crate is a perfect home for them when their humans are away. When I'm old and retired the greyhound will probably be my "2nd breed". I really like them and recommend them often.

molly
 

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Nancy Jocoy said:
I knew about anesthesia being different for greyhounds and found a link:

http://www.gpa.mn.org/Links/anesthesia.htm
Valerie, FWIW, this is a rescue group in my hometown that has a very solid reputation and very active presence...and very successful, there are a TON of greyhounds adopted out in Mpls. I'd contact them for additional help we may not be able to provide you here.
 

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Woody Taylor said:
Nancy Jocoy said:
I knew about anesthesia being different for greyhounds and found a link:

http://www.gpa.mn.org/Links/anesthesia.htm
Valerie, FWIW, this is a rescue group in my hometown that has a very solid reputation and very active presence...and very successful, there are a TON of greyhounds adopted out in Mpls. I'd contact them for additional help we may not be able to provide you here.
Forgot to add my vet clinic's docs do a lot of work with greyhound rescue on the side, I can also ask them if necessary.
 

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Hi Valerie,

Molly and Woody are telling you exactly what I turned up with Google.

(Thanks, Susan, for the thumbs-up! Valerie and I email quite a bit and I was the one who turned up and sent her the info on the useless rescue that failed her..... :( )

I've never seen a coyote-dog in person, but the pics online do not confuse me about whether they are greyhounds or not. Sheesh!
 

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I think when they say "coyote dog" they mean people are using greyhounds or other sighthounds to hunt coyote. I know in VA it is legal to hunt deer with dogs - the chosen "breed" is a "deer hound" which has nothing to do with the AKC breed Scottish Deerhound. It is a Beagle, or a Beagle crossed with coonhound - they call them deerhounds. Not a breed, just a dog used to hunt deer.

molly
 

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I've hunted coyotes behind a couple of lurchers. Usually a sighthound/working dog cross. Very traditional hunters in Great Britian.
Tons of info on the web!
Gen George Custer was a big fan of lurchers and had a few. I suspect those got et by ****** though. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Maren Bell said:
Are you guys from Kansas I assume? I was at a dog show in the spring and I got to talking to a lady with a ton of salukis (she had like 8 or 9 in tow). I casually started asking her if any mushers had ever approached her because a lot of the sighthounds are used in Alaskan husky crosses and that sort of thing. She said no, but she said she had been asked if she would sell some as coyote dogs, so yes, I guess I had heard of that as well. Not sure how legal that is, but anyways...if you guys are from Kansas, one of the foster coordinators of the shelter I volunteer and foster for has some good contacts with Rescued Racers out in St. Louis. If you can get her out to Columbia, I could do transport into St. Louis if they approve it:

http://www.rescuedracers.com/contact/adoptContact.asp
I am from KS but have had a very hard time getting the rescues to help out.
St. Louis is a 8 hour drive and not sure where Columbia is.

Right now I have her and have gotter her shots and heart worm checked,
Spaying is around 100 $$ and I'm not rollin in doe :oops:
But have found a vet that will work on GH and have apt for the 12th

The GH is really different for me to work with, my guy is an 80 pound power house. She is taller and longer but only weighs 48 pounds.

She seem so breakable :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Molly Graf said:
yes I have heard that sighthounds are sensitive to anesthesia. So that is the "health problem" the vet is probably concerned about. Other than that, as far as I know Greyhounds are very healthy, the breed is 99% free of hip dysplasia, they usually have nice temperaments and are excellent choices for elderly people - they are quiet, rarely bark, are not destructive, not usually aggressive to other dogs, not extremely playful so maybe not the "retrieve a ball and wrestle with" dog that kids might like to have. They are ok with smaller dogs and cats as long as they are exposed to them and taught not to chase them. They can never be off leash (unless they are obedience trained or on e-collar), do need to run sometimes because they love to - are sensitive to heat and cold weather, and do need a soft place to sleep (like your couch). They are very clean dogs and extremely easy to housebreak even as adults. They are crate-trained already if they came from the track, so a thick bed inside a large crate is a perfect home for them when their humans are away. When I'm old and retired the greyhound will probably be my "2nd breed". I really like them and recommend them often.

molly
This girl is dog aggressive hate her crate and throw fits when in it till she finally gives up.
Unless of corse you count today when she learned how to open the door and went on a ram page through my house. tearing down 2 mini blinds and many other things including scratching the door frame of both the front and back doors.
She also want so chase small animals cats and small dogs.

Other than that she is a sweet heart :roll:

Right now I'm not real happy she is whining Loudly and trying my patients.
She is demanding out of the kennel and she is fine and has been put to bed.
And that is where she is staying. :x
 
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