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I do most of my own patch work if a dog or wild animal gets hurt. I also medicate my own dogs even to drugs like tetracycline to amoxicillin. I feel there is more I need to learn. I'm looking for surgery, disease and infection veterinary books. Please reply if anyone has suggestions.
 

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David Ross said:
I do most of my own patch work if a dog or wild animal gets hurt. I also medicate my own dogs even to drugs like tetracycline to amoxicillin. I feel there is more I need to learn. I'm looking for surgery, disease and infection veterinary books. Please reply if anyone has suggestions.
Do you have book The Merck Veterinary Manual (MVM)?

Of course, it's a kinda gigantic vet overview, but a very good "first look," IMO. My opinion is based on what I have gleaned from the online version, so I can't really address the book itself. I'd like to have it. :>)

You might be looking more for small animals:

http://bookstore.ucdavis.edu/Display.cfm?ItemID=1007 is a good quick "field guide."

This addresses emergency care:
http://www.amazon.com/Emergency-Procedures-Small-Animal-Veterinarian/dp/0702024872

I haven't read it yet, but I've heard good things from people taking canine nutrition.

And this 5-minute consult handbook is invaluable. I have an old edition, but I plan to upgrade next book-buy-go-round:

http://www.amazon.com/5-Minute-Vete...078174038X/ref=pd_sim_b_2/103-4672593-4515066

Editing to add that while this is not a book, it's a good online resource from Merck:

http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/30900.htm

Check out the Advanced Search function. 8)
 

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definitely the merck manual. i have the 5th and 6th editions; they are invaluable for learning both the normal values (excellent tables!), the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of *everything*, broken down into clear and concise body-systems, plus everything from "Behavior" to "Zoonoses".

this book will give you the information to have an informed discussion w/vet when it's necessary, and an informed basis upon which to decide if a discussion w/vet is necessary in the first place.

wish i had the latest edition! some of the diet info in mine is outdated, and some of the canine behavioral stuff is also outdated, but that's not why i have it--i have it for a resource to initiate &/or continue an informed discussion w/my vet.

i'd be very interested in hearing about other recommended books.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
ann freier said:
definitely the merck manual. i have the 5th and 6th editions; they are invaluable for learning both the normal values (excellent tables!), the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of *everything*, broken down into clear and concise body-systems, plus everything from "Behavior" to "Zoonoses".
I only wish most breeders would pick up at least this book. I'm not sure if the merck has it but humans can get brucellosis from animals. Some breeders I spoke to knew, but the majority didn't know. B. Canis can be contracted via blood, semen, or sexual fluids. The only reason I research is for my own knowledge, and certainly not for paranoia. I'll definitely be getting a merck manual as I currently don't have one. I've been doing everything by papers to talking with professionals.
 

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MVM, 6th edition, pp644-645. "...transmission is congenital or venereal or by ingestion o f infective materials.....transmission from dogs to man and other animals is known."

it goes on to cover "clinical findings", "diagnosis", and "control".

there has to be a book out there similar to "Horse owner's veterinary handbook" which would be an excellent, practical back-up to merck. i just don't know what it is :( :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
hmm as far for drugs, the Plumb's Veterinary Drug Handbook looks good. I guess in the next couple weeks I'll be going on a spending spree.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Connie Sutherland said:
ann freier said:
... there has to be a book out there similar to "Horse owner's veterinary handbook" which would be an excellent, practical back-up to merck. i just don't know what it is :( :(
http://www.amazon.com/Owners-Veterinary-Handbook-Howell-Reference/dp/0876052014

The Dog Owner's Veterinary Handbook
:) I went to the local book store and they had a copy of this book. I looked through it and all the information the book contains I already know. Also, I'm offended at the book's author. There is no mention of stopping bleeding, or any real type of medical knowledge in emergencies. Let me paraphrase, "If the dog gets an injury like a laceration, wrap it up and take him to the vet immediately"

Okay, If I wanted to let the dog loose blood all the way to the vets I'd folow this. I'm the type of person who now has plenty of medical supplies, sutures, and also a nice stock of super glue.

I'd have to rewrite the boko with notes like..
1. Stop bleeding
2. if bleeded stopped, superglue/dermabond/other sealant the wound
3. take to vet for medications if out of cephalexin


I dislike most vet attitudes. Its hard to find good vets who openly admit the problems are usually the same. Its nice to work at a vet clinic, you learn all types of procedures. Some train staff for routine surgery who stay for years, others do the lab work. Its very routine, its like biology class. I've a vet who is open, vet strict, hes a good vet. Gave me my requested medication and even recommended others, a good guy. I usually take said requested and recommend and test them all out, heh.
 

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David Ross said:
Connie Sutherland said:
ann freier said:
... there has to be a book out there similar to "Horse owner's veterinary handbook" which would be an excellent, practical back-up to merck. i just don't know what it is :( :(
http://www.amazon.com/Owners-Veterinary-Handbook-Howell-Reference/dp/0876052014

The Dog Owner's Veterinary Handbook
:) I went to the local book store and they had a copy of this book. I looked through it and all the information the book contains I already know. Also, I'm offended at the book's author. There is no mention of stopping bleeding, or any real type of medical knowledge in emergencies. Let me paraphrase, "If the dog gets an injury like a laceration, wrap it up and take him to the vet immediately".....
This is good to know. I had not read it --- just answering the question about the dog equivalent to the "Horse Owner's Vet Handbook." I like this kind of feedback; that book won't be on my wish list, with advice like you paraphrased!

By any chance did you get a look at the book that people in my canine nutrition class were talking about: Emergency Procedures fot the Small Animal Vet? I think that is remaining on my wish list. :D

But Merck continues to be THE well-thumbed canine healthcare book around my house.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Connie Sutherland said:
By any chance did you get a look at the book that people in my canine nutrition class were talking about: Emergency Procedures fot the Small Animal Vet? I think that is remaining on my wish list. :D

But Merck continues to be THE well-thumbed canine healthcare book around my house.
Hmm, sounds interesting. I'll have to see about ordering the book. I've some money which people sent me for the holidays. :) Looks very interesting.
 
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