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A good PPD dog, in my opinion, is a dog with a heart to attack the assailant that tries to attack you. No amount of artificial testing, no choosing of breed will give you what you want. Either the dog will protect you or he won't. A Malinois will protect you as well as any other dog that feels the need to protect its leader.

Some breeds, such as Fila Braileiros, etc. are wary of strangers by nature and will warn you quickly and will be ready to go to the fro. I know, I had one. It took all of twelve months to really socialise him but he still kept his vigilence over us. My Landseer wouldn't let anyone touch me, even in fun.

Testing these dogs wasn't necessary. Whether they would have gone after the flleeeing assailant doesn't interest me. They were there to protect us outside and in the home where they lived with us.

I've heard a lot of good reports of Malinois. One was wicked - they had to call him off before he ripped the assaiant to pieces but this isn't a PPD's job in this country. This is reserved for the police.

Why shouldn't a Malinois be a good PPD. I'm pretty sure if we had one he would protect us like the others.
The GSDs we now have are also more than likely to do so.

It's not just the breed IMO - it has to do with the setup dog + handler + family and whether the dog is strong and confident enough to do what's expected of him. In England our JRTs worked together as a team when my Dad was accosted by a drunkard. One went for the neck - the cat-like one and the other - corgi style - went for the legs.
 

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I love my Mals- I have 5, and I think 3 of them would protect for real, one would hesitate, then probably protect? and the other, well he is running for the hills, and he can run pretty fast!!
All a ball of energy, all the time- but I think it depends on the individual dog- not necessarily the breed.
Can most people handle a Mal- probably not. IMO
 

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Those damn little terriers are monsters, LOL. The worst bite my trainer ever recieved was from a little bosten terrier. Those little terriers are scrappy fighters. Little man syndrome8-[
 

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I love my Mals
but I think it depends on the individual dog- not necessarily the breed.
Can most people handle a Mal- probably not. IMO
Hi Mo,
I am incline to get a Mal pup for myself too but would like to hear from your side at the same time. Base on your experience of owning Mals, what sort of owners are 'suitable' to own this breed ? Please share. Cheers.
 

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Very active owners are good. They obviously need both physical and mental exercise. With a dog like a Rottweiler and some GSDs, they are bulls in a china shop until they mature around 2-3 yrs and then they settle a bit. So when you go train your 4-5 year old Rottie or GSD, that can be most of the exercise for the day, maybe playing some ball in the backyard and they'll settle in the house. While I think more for a similar aged adult Malinois, you've got to go bike with them, hiking off leash, etc to wear them down to get them to settle in the house easier. Both my Mals and my Mal/GSD cross are pretty good *knock on wood* in the house, but it takes a good bit of exercise to keep them that way. I have not found on leash walks to be sufficient except just taking a bit of the edge off.

I think being real heavy handed with them (at least in my limited experience of 2.5 dogs) backfires. My younger is medium hard and can take a fair correction and not at all handler aggressive. However, if he's too excited about something, like getting leashed up to get in the car and I correct him on a prong collar not even super hard, he doesn't shut down like many dogs would from a correction. He just gets too stimulated from it and gets even more excited. So too much crank and yank, especially with a dog who disagrees with you on what a "fair" correction is, is likely not a great idea. I've had no problems motivating my two and going easy on the correctons though.
 

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Thanks Maren for your experience. Talking about daily walk with a Mal, will a 45 mins walk daily enough to wear off some of the energy besides 15 to 20 mins of OB training ? Cheers.
 

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Uh....not in my experience. It may take the "edge" off the energy, but the dog will still want to be busy.

My Mals go for a 2 to 3 mile run daily (I ride the four wheeler) and we train everyday for obedience work (not competition style, just obedience and I work on new stuff if the dog is ready). Either daily or every other day we train for whatever job they have and also do some agility work.

Still going.....but they can at least settle when told in the house.

Marker training is fun and wears their little brains out as well. I do this a lot with the pups since you cannot exercise them too much on their growing bones and joints.
 

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Hi Carol,
Thanks for sharing. Since you are awake (I presume) at this hour on the other side of the world there. LOL. It is 10:21 in the morning over here now.

What breed do you think will be more suitable to live the house with the family members around ? Basically, I intend to work the pup for OB (utmost priority) and hopefully I get to advance thereof to something else later. Just wanna do one thing at a time. Please share. Cheers.
 

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I did not think I would ever say this, and Betty and Jason are going to razz me for it.....

What do you think about GSD's?

I am not saying Mals and Dutchies do not make good family companions, but if your not clear on what you want to do besides obedience yet....a Mal may prove to be a bit of a handful for you.

Not trying to discourage you at all, as even some of the GSD's out there can be a challenge as well, but I am not wondering if they would not be a better choice for you and your family?
 

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Carol,
I did think about a GSD as well. Just thinking that if I can't get a good female GSD pup, I will go for a female Mal pup instead that I know a breeder who has experience raising Mals both male and female from pup to adulthood. At least, I could get some advice whenever the needs arise (which is a lot). LOL Honestly, the kind of work I would like to do with my pup later on (after OB) is agility and protection related. It is just that I try not to be too ambitious about it as it is going to be my very first working pup. Just wanna go slow and hopefully I get to see the light later. I am green here. Cheers.
 

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Yeah, mine are the same. A leash walk really doesn't do much for them. I mean, you can if you want to if you really enjoy walking around the neighborhood or whatever. But they'll likely need something on top of that every other day at absolute minimum.

The best way I've found to exercise them as adults to find a trail, turn them off leash (assuming your dog has an excellent recall, of course), and bike (or a four wheeler, like Carol suggested) down the trail while they run usually between a fast trot to full tilt gallop the whole time. Going like this for just 15 minutes will be way more effective than a 45 minute walk. Something like a Springer for a bike attachment might be good if you don't have any off leash trails they can safely go on. Mine are actually pretty good house dogs (all are asleep at my feet now), but then again, I took the younger dogs for a bike ride before sunset this afternoon. The main time they drive me really crazy is during January or whatever when it's too cold or icy to do much outside. I may have them pull the kiddie sled if I need something hauled if there's snow, but usually that's when we work on lots of quick obedience sessions.

If you're wanting nice flashy obedience, that can come from many kinds of dogs that are still active, but don't need quite as much. GSDs, Rotties, pit bulls, etc all could probably work. Border collies and Aussies would be too, but they have high exercise requirements too.
 

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If you're wanting nice flashy obedience, that can come from many kinds of dogs that are still active, but don't need quite as much. GSDs, Rotties, pit bulls, etc all could probably work. Border collies and Aussies would be too, but they have high exercise requirements too.
I admit that I've never lived with a Malinois and so I don't know quite HOW active they are, but I know that pits really run the gamut from lazy lap dogs to crazy pocket rockets that need the amount of exercise you're suggesting for a Mal. This is really probably due to overbreeding mediocre dogs, though =(
 

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Maren and Ashley, what are you guys doing at the wee hour of the day there ? Over here is 1338 in the afternoon in my country.

Maren,
From your description of the Mal, does it mean that one has to work the Mal all the time all day long something like a workholic ? Cheers
 

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Hi Colin, I think anyone that wants a Mal, just needs to be dedicated- in giving them the time they require.
Some may argue all dogs need attention- which is true, Mals just need that much more. IMO
We started training Hugo his positions at 6 weeks old-started his bite work right away also-of course using a flirt pole- he was like a sponge, learning fast- but HIGH HIGH energy, a ton of drive- is not handler aggressive, but if the decoy puts up a stronger fight- the fight is on- he gets that from Chico-"hardhead"!! He is ready to go by 6:30 a.m. and will let you know...we said we should have called him Rooster...
- got Tango at 6 months, and was able to get his Brevet in French Ring just about the time he was a year old.Another sponge,great dog, super social too... We trained 3 times a week, formally- and exercise,swimming,running and training daily.
-got Chico older, he was ?6 or so, was still able to compete with him in PSA, NVBK, had fun- he is over 11 now, and still has a ton of energy- also real social, and just a great dog!
-Tora we got at ?a year old, she needs just as much exercise,can be moody, and is very vocal when she doesn't get her way.
and finally we have Rebel, he is a Chico,Tora son- a little over 2 now, and another ball of energy, today he couldn't find a ball in the yard, so an Apple became the next best thing. At times we bring them in the house, but in the Kennel,if they are bored-they will start doing what... we call it the Malinois dance- they all come out, run to the end of the kennel, come back and bounce of the building and start again....they will do this over and over-...they all do it...

If you are to busy with work or family- a Mal might not be the right dog- most aren't the typical family pet dog-But... if you invest the time, energy and get involved in a club or some kind of agility,tracking,bitework,flyball...etc training- they are an all around awesome dog and can be a blast-definately start training, socialization, and what ever kind of training you think you are going to get involved in...EARLY....it will make things so much easier. good luck Mo
 

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Morning Mo,
Thank you so much for your advice. Just would like to check with you if this is ok. Besides training or working your Mals, are you with them all the time ? Or, you leave them in the dog yard or kennel bound while you are away at work ? Cheers.
 

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I've only had two Mals, and for less then 6-7 months. I realize I can't judge them all by two pups but I can't handle the nerve/envoronmental issues they had.
I've also seen to many older ones that show great drives but turn into spooks when not in drive and out of their ellement.
Just an observation from someone that cringes when I see a dog that isn't confident all the time.
There are some good Mal breeders here that could probalby make a liar out of me though. :grin: :wink:
 

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Yeah Bob, you need to find a good dog/breeder. I got lucky with my first mal. Cyko has no nerve or environmental issues. He is sharper, quicker to react, more suspicious of things unknown, but he isn't spooky in any way. Havoc, however, appears super confident and happy untill stressed - and then he will spook bigtime. I still have hopes that he will grow out of it, he has been getting better as he's matured...
 

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Hi Colin, when we are at work- our GSD's can be left in the house, unattended-but for the Mals, we have kennels- indoor and outdoor a/c runs,they can be out all day, or go inside and be out of the weather, the kennel runs are fixed with tops on the runs-the Mals have all been taught the palisade(from French Ring) so can easily jump out of the runs (6ft high) as well as the perimeter fencing. So to be responsible, and not to keep them locked in a crate in the house all day-they each have their own run.( and they use it, doing the Malinois dance) Right now as I type this, I have Tango and Hugo lying on the living room floor- once I decide to go to bed, Hugo goes in a crate, Tango he will stay in our room and be fine.Rebel,Tora and Chico pretty much stay in the kennel-but have access to the yard when we are home, and do well. Hope this helps...Mo
 

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Morning Mo,
I intend to have my pup to be indoor as part of the family from day one when we are home. As for starter, I think I will bring her to my parents' house when we go to work when there's no one at home. At least, this is for puppy stage. And then, we will pick her up from work. That much, she's still in touch with humans around the whole day round and from my work place to parents' house is about 20mins drive so I could still go and see her during my lunch break.

Then, we will have 24/7 with her for the whole weekend. What do you think of my arrangement for my future pup ? Of course, I intend to build a kennel run for her so that I can put her in there when she turns adult if she's not going to my parents' house.

Please advice and let me know your view. Cheers.
 

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hi Colin, I think your plan sounds good. I would definately crate train your pup for housebreaking-it will not only make housebreaking easier, your pup will travel easier being used to the crate, and if you start going to clubs to train, a lot of the times, your dog will be in the crate, until it is your turn.

I would also allow some alone time, where she is not around anyone, even if only for an hour or so a day, so you don't cause her to have a separation anxiety when she does have to be alone- otherwise, I think you will have a lucky pup!! If I can be of any help, email me anytime...good luck Mo
 
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