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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So Andi and Abbie got into it, the beagle sustained some pretty nasty injuries to her neck. She started it; Andromeda finished it. Abbie went to the vet's Friday to have her (copulous) stitches out. She is shaven from the side of her face all the way down her neck, pretty noticeable.

There's some guy at the counter while we're waiting for a room to become available. He looks and me, wrinkles his nose, and asks what the he!! happened to my dog. I tell him she bit off more than she could chew, attacked one of my shepherds. He says, "Aw, now, she shoulda known better. Those shepherds, they'll fight to the death." I ask him what he means. "Well, shepherds are more aggressive than other dogs." I point blank tell him that's not true. "Well now my Boston terrier, she has no fight in her. But every shepherd I've ever seen would tear your face off." I say that's a big misconception. So then he says, "Well, it's all in how you raise him." I smile and say, "Sir, that's true of any breed."

The vet called us at that point.

So I'll throw this one out there: are certain breeds of dog "more agressive" than others? Which breeds are those? What exactly should we define "aggression" as? How can we explain public perception of shepherds and related breeds as "dangerous," "aggressive," or "likely to fight"?
 

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Well, in short, since I only have one hand to type w/at the moment, bully breeds do tend to be more animal aggressive in general, because they were originally created and bred to fight bears, boars, bulls, and themselves. I've never heard that certain breeds are more inherently likely to show human aggression (when brought up in an ideal environment as opposed to an abusive one, and with no training FOR aggression), though.
 

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Simple answer. Some breeds have more aggressive tendencies. That doesn't make them automatically aggresive.
So many factors involved. Aggression based on fear. Aggression based on dominance. Aggresion to people, other dogs, etc.
Terriers are generally more aggressive towards other dogs and other animals then, say, a Beagle. A Beagle is a pack dog, thus more inclined to get along with other dogs.
Different lines of different breeds will also have more aggression towards other dogs, people, etc.
Some lines of GSDs, Mals are more apt to have a willingness to bite. Others lines wouldn't bite if their life depended on it.
Changing the publics mind on this is the whole problem in a nutshell. That's the unfortunate facts that creat BSL.
 

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Interesting question... same that dictates BSL. I believe that a dog from specific, carefully bred lines CAN have the tendancy to show the characteristics it was bred for. For example, people looking for a PPD don't look for lines with champion show dogs. Now, like all animals, there are exceptions. Take Mike S.'s dog, Cujo, for example. This dog is a working dog out of show lines. So to say EVERY dog, be they pitbull, german shepherd, or chihuahua, will be a certain trait is kind of hard to say. I do agree, however, that dogs of unknown lineage must be dealt with carefully. Dogs with bad raps (pitbulls, rotties, etc) are more likely to be out of aggressive lines than a labarador.
I probably sound a little confusing (I've had a LONG night last night), but what I'm trying to say is you can try to guage what a dog will be based on his/her lineage, but each animal is an individual and so is each environment of maturation, so there shouldn't be any sort of cookie-cutter generalization on any breed.
(See why BSL supporters hate me?)
 

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What does BSL stand for?

The shepherd is from origin bred to defend the herd, his people and his property. So it is likely to be their more agressive to strangers, attackers, in common not a person/dog which belongs his pack.
Agression is usually not without a reason and if the boss says it is ok, the dog will relax..and that part is upbringing.

Does this makes any sense to you? I´m getting tired, so to make a proper english sentence is more difficult now. :? :roll: :oops:
 

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What does BSL stand for?
Breed Specific Legislation, or, in other words, banning the ownership of certain breeds of dogs within certain city or county limits. Basically, the government dictating what breed(s) of dog(s) we can and cannot own if we choose to live in certain areas. Right now the most common breeds that are banned are pit bulls, rottweilers, and similar type dogs, but chows, akitas, and german shepherds are also on the list in some places.
 

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Stacia, aren't you glad you didn't have Achilles with you at the vet's when that guy spouted off about shepherds being aggressive? :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Kristen Cabe said:
Stacia, aren't you glad you didn't have Achilles with you at the vet's when that guy spouted off about shepherds being aggressive? :lol:
HEY! Achilles is getting better. Not 100% cured, but BETTER :lol:

For instance: the neighbor's dog was in our yard earlier this morning and he only barked his ass off for five minutes instead of 30! That's progress!!!!!!!
 

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Kristen Cabe said:
What does BSL stand for?
Breed Specific Legislation, or, in other words, banning the ownership of certain breeds of dogs within certain city or county limits. Basically, the government dictating what breed(s) of dog(s) we can and cannot own if we choose to live in certain areas. Right now the most common breeds that are banned are pit bulls, rottweilers, and similar type dogs, but chows, akitas, and german shepherds are also on the list in some places.
thanks Kristen en Connie, we´ve something similar.

The non fci registred am.staff/pittbull and those who can meet the standard with these dogs. They´ve talked about rotties, dogo, mastino etc. but it did became a law. Individual dogs, with an agressive, regristred background, can be told to ware a muzzle always outside and always on the leash. If such regulation is done for a particular dog and dog/owner is mistaking again, a dog maybe have his final shot. But it doesn´t happen often (thnk god!)
 

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Stacia Porter said:
Kristen Cabe said:
Stacia, aren't you glad you didn't have Achilles with you at the vet's when that guy spouted off about shepherds being aggressive? :lol:
HEY! Achilles is getting better. Not 100% cured, but BETTER :lol:

For instance: the neighbor's dog was in our yard earlier this morning and he only barked his ass off for five minutes instead of 30! That's progress!!!!!!!
:lol: :lol: :lol:

maturing and practise does a lot :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Selena van Leeuwen said:
Stacia Porter said:
Kristen Cabe said:
Stacia, aren't you glad you didn't have Achilles with you at the vet's when that guy spouted off about shepherds being aggressive? :lol:
HEY! Achilles is getting better. Not 100% cured, but BETTER :lol:

For instance: the neighbor's dog was in our yard earlier this morning and he only barked his ass off for five minutes instead of 30! That's progress!!!!!!!
:lol: :lol: :lol:

maturing and practise does a lot :wink:
Absolutely, Selena! That and coming to the conclusion that the dog is just a barker and trying to prevent him for barking all together is a fruitless pasttime LOL! It is HIS yard after all...now he just shuts up when I tell him to (which is helpful).

He also leaves other dogs and people alone on walks now. That's just come with age. As long as the "offender" isn't in the yard, he doesn't give a crap.
 

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I think you have chosen a right path for you 2, you probably both feel better this way.
 

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I'm not a bully breed expert, but from what I do know, the same gameness in an AmStaff or an APBT that can make them want to throw down with each other at the drop of a hat also lends them to being excellent SAR and weight pulling dogs who don't want to quit. As I try to tell people, the Rottweiler service dog that was trained to call 911 for its owner, the Doberman who is a guide dog for the blind, and the pit bull who is a therapy dog for sick kids or the elderly all come from the same respective breeds as those that splash the headlines in the newspapers for attacks or maulings.
 
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