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dog and human bonding
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Old 05-04-2016, 11:07 AM   #11 (permalink)
Ankle Biter
 
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Re: dog and human bonding

so here’s my questions :
- how do you actually evaluate the bond when you are assessing a dog and owner/handler ?
New Handler and dog walk on field, I ask them to simply "Play with your dog" then "Obedience with your dog"

- what types of interactions show you how their bond is ?
After watching the above responses ranging from a quizzical expression from both handler and dog, dogs running off the field, to Ball play and Tugs

- what types of interactions can be used to strengthen a weak bond and make it stronger ?
Time spent together, Calm just reaction with corrections and just plan excitement and pleasure when you dog does something right.

- what types of interactions would be your red flags that the bond is not what it should be ?
Lack of attention in dog or handler, trust issues, and stress when their should be none.

- does the bond need to be continually reinforced over time or does it stay the same once the relationship has been established ? (for example : bonding with your pup)
Yes, it should be continually reinforced.

- does it take a certain level of “dog/handler reading” skills to do this or should anyone be capable of evaluating the bond ? (iow, can it be self evaluated?)
Yes, it takes a certain amount of "dog/handler reading skills" and yes, you can self evaluate everyone has a video camera these days.

- should there be a different kind of bond for working and non-working dogs ?
Not certain if the bond should be different, but should definitely be stronger in working dogs and handlers.

Just my 2 cents worth.
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Old 05-04-2016, 11:18 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Re: dog and human bonding

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie Bravo View Post
so here’s my questions :
- how do you actually evaluate the bond when you are assessing a dog and owner/handler ?
New Handler and dog walk on field, I ask them to simply "Play with your dog" then "Obedience with your dog"

- what types of interactions show you how their bond is ?
After watching the above responses ranging from a quizzical expression from both handler and dog, dogs running off the field, to Ball play and Tugs

- what types of interactions can be used to strengthen a weak bond and make it stronger ?
Time spent together, Calm just reaction with corrections and just plan excitement and pleasure when you dog does something right.

- what types of interactions would be your red flags that the bond is not what it should be ?
Lack of attention in dog or handler, trust issues, and stress when their should be none.

- does the bond need to be continually reinforced over time or does it stay the same once the relationship has been established ? (for example : bonding with your pup)
Yes, it should be continually reinforced.

- does it take a certain level of “dog/handler reading” skills to do this or should anyone be capable of evaluating the bond ? (iow, can it be self evaluated?)
Yes, it takes a certain amount of "dog/handler reading skills" and yes, you can self evaluate everyone has a video camera these days.

- should there be a different kind of bond for working and non-working dogs ?
Not certain if the bond should be different, but should definitely be stronger in working dogs and handlers.

Just my 2 cents worth.
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Old 05-04-2016, 12:11 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Re: dog and human bonding

does it take a certain level of “dog/handler reading” skills to do this or should anyone be capable of evaluating the bond ? (iow, can it be self evaluated?)
I think it depends on the dog and the breed. It was quite easy for me, not naturally skilled handler, to develop a very tight bond with my Australian Shepherds. It was very difficult for me to develop a bond with my Dutch Shep. My DS is dominant, confident, independent, pushy and possessive. I did not have the skills to bond with this well. I used experience from my Aussies, much more attuned to handler, not pushy, gently independent, and not possessive. The experience did not transfer well to the DS. I needed help and worked with a trainer that had malinois and had trained with Balabanov. We used lots of play to start developing a working bond. I also had to hone skills at reading the dog because to not do it, gave him opportunities that he gladly took. I probably was not reading the aussies well but the consequences were minimal.


- should there be a different kind of bond for working and non-working dogs ?
I'm not sure if it "should" be different but with a breed that loves "work", "work" is a great way to develop a bond. Again with the DS, he arrived at 8 weeks with a work ethic. To ignore that would not have helped bond building.
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Old 05-05-2016, 01:26 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Re: dog and human bonding

re : "I think it depends on the dog and the breed. It was quite easy for me, not naturally skilled handler, to develop a very tight bond with my Australian Shepherds. It was very difficult for me to develop a bond with my Dutch Shep. My DS is dominant, confident, independent, pushy and possessive. I did not have the skills to bond with this well. I used experience from my Aussies, much more attuned to handler, not pushy, gently independent, and not possessive. The experience did not transfer well to the DS. I needed help and worked with a trainer that had malinois and had trained with Balabanov. We used lots of play to start developing a working bond. I also had to hone skills at reading the dog because to not do it, gave him opportunities that he gladly took. I probably was not reading the aussies well but the consequences were minimal"

bond ---- mutual and reciprocal trust and respect

please use this specific criteria and mention them when you write up your responses

sorry that we have lost most of the old timers who posted on this before but it is interesting to read about how others describe their bond with their dog

as a trainer i mostly deal with other people's dogs and that is why i geared this towards evaluating other dogs. but i realize it certainly pertains to your own.
- i do think that even with a lot of experience, other trainers can observe things that we are missing when we read our dogs
- it happens all the time when mwd handlers are working together. comments are made and are often accepted...but not always //LOL//

too many cooks can spoil the broth but a cohesive team of chefs can turn out nice dishes too
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Old 05-05-2016, 12:52 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Re: dog and human bonding

One thing that you can measure and that I think reflects a bond, is when a dog trusts you enough to take of him when he is sick or injured or has a wound that needs cared for. With a strong bond, the dog knows you are trying to help him, even though doing so might cause discomfort or distress.
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Old 05-06-2016, 12:05 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Re: dog and human bonding

re : "One thing that you can measure and that I think reflects a bond, is when a dog trusts you enough to take of him when he is sick or injured or has a wound that needs cared for. With a strong bond, the dog knows you are trying to help him, even though doing so might cause discomfort or distress."

i've wondered about that too...it makes sense

but it also might be connected to how much the dog was conditioned to handling while being groomed and cared for by the handler
- reactivity to handling is one of the ways i evaluate trust and respect between dog/handler and i always ask the owner/handler to give their dog a thorough handling and grooming session....
- open their mouth and check back teeth...check into ears.....close inspection between paws...tail handled...etc etc
- the red flags would be obvious regarding whether it is a trust or respect issue (avoidance and anxiety versus growling and signs of aggression)

my train of thought is : dogs that resist being handled with close physical contact may be less likely to allow handling when injured ??

too many times i've heard "no, he doesn't like it when i check his teeth....so i don't do that very much"

agree/don't agree ???
- for me, handling is a bonding issue
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Old 05-06-2016, 12:22 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Re: dog and human bonding

was hesitating to bring this up on this forum of dog people but will do it anyway

cats....evidence of a close bond can be MUCH clearer than with a dog
handle a cat when it is young and it will trust and respect you all its life to handle it
allow a cat to grow up and mature without a lot of close, physical handling and you run the risk of being slashed and bit no matter how strong of a "bond" you think you might have developed over the years //rotflmao//

but maybe there is a carry over....
the more "predator genetics" your dog has in its DNA, the more it acts like a cat and the easier it is to see this //lol//
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Old 05-06-2016, 06:56 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Re: dog and human bonding

[QUOTE=rick smith;717282]
too many times i've heard "no, he doesn't like it when i check his teeth....so i don't do that very much"

Every dog I have had has let me brush and clean his/her teeth with a scaler.
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Old 05-06-2016, 08:04 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Re: dog and human bonding

re: "Every dog I have had has let me brush and clean his/her teeth with a scaler."

neither have I
- what's your point ?
- mine was that it is not a rare problem and in my opinion, indicative of a poor bond that needs some "adjustment" ....
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Old 05-06-2016, 08:46 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Re: dog and human bonding

My point is that I have always bonded well with my dogs.
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