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Raw problems
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Old 06-03-2015, 05:13 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Re: Raw problems

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Originally Posted by Connie Sutherland View Post
Do you have the food he was on? I'd give tiny snack-meals and wait for the poop results to be firm logs before increasing the food (and then after that, going back to raw). And I'd start the raw with small "peeled" snack-size meals.

It may sound like overkill, but diarrhea is much easier to avoid than fix, IME.
Will do Connie. Thanks
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Old 06-03-2015, 05:14 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Re: Raw problems

Thanks for the input folks
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Old 06-04-2015, 12:49 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Re: Raw problems

i've used chicken necks successfully on more than one dog. otherwise i wouldn't have suggested it. not sure of the bone/meat ratio as compared to backs but i think backs would be more expensive. chicken necks are actually longer than what i imagined....at least over here they are
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Old 06-04-2015, 10:52 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Re: Raw problems

I don't feed raw atm but did for years. Whenever my dogs got the runs I did 2 things. 1) skip a feeding 2) feed 1/2 a can of mashed pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling, but pumpkin). Then back to a regular feeding the next day. The pumpkin increases viscosity in the intestines and slows things down as they move through. You can even add a spoonful to regular meals for maintenance, but this isn't a replacement for bone.

Moving forward if it continues I would increase the bone amount. Chicken backs are great for increasing bone. Remember when u feed just gizzards your not getting any bone content and bone is what makes the stool firm.
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Old 06-04-2015, 12:55 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Re: Raw problems

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Originally Posted by lannie dulin View Post
I don't feed raw atm but did for years. Whenever my dogs got the runs I did 2 things. 1) skip a feeding 2) feed 1/2 a can of mashed pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling, but pumpkin). Then back to a regular feeding the next day. The pumpkin increases viscosity in the intestines and slows things down as they move through. You can even add a spoonful to regular meals for maintenance, but this isn't a replacement for bone.

Moving forward if it continues I would increase the bone amount. Chicken backs are great for increasing bone. Remember when u feed just gizzards your not getting any bone content and bone is what makes the stool firm.

Good info here. Calcium in the bone is indeed the big poop-firmer.
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Old 06-04-2015, 01:37 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Re: Raw problems

using pumpkin as a stool hardener has been well documented
- it is mostly the fiber that is doing the work; not unlike additives that the kibble makers use (Science diet with peanut shells, etc)
- i have never seen any clear data that it has much nutritional value, but it does contain at least 80% water which will help a dog who is dehydrated from the runs

i prefer to do it with the calcium intake in a high bone to meat ratio like chicken necks; plus they are getting the protein from the chicken, which is a win win

nothing wrong with backs; i have just found necks work quicker.
the only cons i have had with stateside people is not being able to find them in bulk since they are not sold that way in most markets

with that said, if any dog would not get firm stools that way i would definitely be looking for another diet
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Old 06-04-2015, 02:28 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Re: Raw problems

You may find this site helpful. I think it pretty much echoes what Connie said:

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites...et-part-3.aspx

Changing an animal’s diet too quickly can result in diarrhea. I’ve had several dozen clients that either learn what’s really in their pet’s food, or realize the brand they’ve been feeding is actually quite terrible, and they go home and throw it out. They drive to the local upscale pet boutique and purchase a human-grade raw food, and their pet loves it.

But then the dog or cat becomes very sick after a few days, and off they go to the veterinarian. Most vets erroneously blame all cases of diarrhea on the bacteria in the raw food versus the sudden dietary change, causing the veterinarian and the owner to panic unnecessarily.

Also, dogs and cats process raw foods and kibble very differently. Raw food is processed as a protein, held in the stomach for an acid bath, unlike kibble, which a dog or cat’s body views metabolically as a starch. If raw foods are added to dry foods for a meal, there can be digestive confusion, resulting in gassiness and belching.

When introducing any new food to a pet with a healthy gut, I recommend using the new food as a treat for a day, and keeping an eye on the condition of the stool. Increase the number of new food treats over the next several days and continue to watch the stool.

If the stool remains normal, replace one whole meal of old food with new food. Do this for several more days, and if the stools remain normal, it’s safe to discontinue the old food and feed only the new food.
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Old 06-04-2015, 03:14 PM   #18 (permalink)
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Re: Raw problems

Could the dog have gotten into some dirty water, e.g. giardia?
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Old 06-04-2015, 03:21 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Re: Raw problems

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Originally Posted by rick smith View Post
i've used chicken necks successfully on more than one dog. otherwise i wouldn't have suggested it. not sure of the bone/meat ratio as compared to backs but i think backs would be more expensive. chicken necks are actually longer than what i imagined....at least over here they are
I used to feed chicken necks as a staple too.

Unfortunately my older GSD now tends to gets constipated with a high bone ratio and conversely, too much skin gives him the runs. Duck necks are larger than chicken necks and come skinned, so no waste. His evening meal nowadays usually consists of a duck neck and some organic beef meat, venison, pork or lamb.

My younger GSD can tolerate chicken necks no problemo, but there's just not enough meat on a chicken neck, unless I give him tons of necks at a time, he starts to quickly get that bony headed, hollow eyed starved look. For him, since he's young, he gets lots of various protein sources like duck necks, venison, beef, pork tails, pork ribs, lamb necks, etc..

For myself personally, I've seen a couple PBS specials as of late documenting the trouble with chicken and it's just kind of turned my stomach, so I'm eating a lot less chicken, unless it's locally raised and butchered, which is not as easy to find as one would think.

That's one of the great things about living up here, my pork, lamb, beef, is all locally sourced, pasture raised, pasture finished, and organic. The venison is wild and courtesy of my hunting neighbors.

Sorry to get off track, Larry...and now back to the regular broadcast schedule...
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Old 06-04-2015, 08:52 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Re: Raw problems

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Originally Posted by Meg O'Donovan View Post
Could the dog have gotten into some dirty water, e.g. giardia?
No Meg. He's all better now. Went back to kibble and I'll start back to raw slow
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